theater

WLRN

The future plans for the Coconut Grove Playhouse, a theater built in the 1920s that was center stage to a plethora of  performances over the years, has become a political topic. 

Courtesy of the Colony Theater

A new musical at the Colony Theatre in Miami Beach tells the story of Afro-Caribbean band Parranda El Clavo. The band comes from the small village of El Clavo nestled in Venezuela’s jungle. They regularly play house concerts around the village and are an essential part of the community.

PETER ANDREW BOSCH / Miami Herald

A controversial plan to revive the historic, long-shuttered Coconut Grove Playhouse that requires demolition of its auditorium narrowly won the endorsement of Miami commissioners on Wednesday, but backers are not celebrating as the potential for a mayoral veto looms.

Peter Cunningham

In the opening scene of Christopher Demos-Brown's play "American Son," a black woman sits alone in the waiting room of a Miami police station, desperately waiting for word of her missing 18-year-old son.

Demos-Brown says the impetus for the story was a number of deadly interactions between American police officers and young black men in recent years. But he says his past experience working in the Miami-Dade State Attorney's office gave him a glimpse of the relationships between law enforcement officers that eventually made it onto the stage.

The Colony Theatre / Courtesy

A new play in Miami explores the implications of Cuban politics on art.

"FAKE" takes place in an auction house in Miami where curators have received an extremely rare painting from prestigious Cuban artist Amelia Pelaez. Immediately, they face questions about its authenticity.

Playwright Carmen Pelaez, the artist's great-niece, wrote FAKE to explore the lengths people will go to protect what they love.

"Art is the only real history that we have," Pelaez said on Sundial.

FAKE is at the Colony Theatre in Miami Beach until Feb. 17.

Katie Lepri / WLRN

Imagine stepping back in time just by stepping into a hotel room.

Through one door, it's 1957 again. A young couple arrives in Miami for the first time.

In another room, it's the mid 90s. A recovering alcoholic has found God and is struggling to stay sober.

In a third, you enter 1964. A Playboy Bunny takes a break from work with a man she's met at the club. 

Broward Center for the Performing Arts

When it first hit the off-broadway stage twenty years ago, Hedwig and the Angry Inch stunned audiences with its progressive stances on homosexuality, transgender identity and crass humor. Since its opening performance, it has been turned into an award-winning film, a Broadway show starring Neil Patrick Harris and a cult classic for lovers of the theater. 

Another producer of a Spanish-language play in Miami is apologizing for showing a character in blackface.

Neil Simon, the enormously productive comic playwright who often adapted his work into screenplays, died on early Sunday morning. He was 91. The cause of death was complications from pneumonia, according to Bill Evans, his longtime friend and publicist.

Among the most prolific playwrights in American theater from the 1960s through the 1990s, he won the Pulitzer Prize in 1991 for Lost in Yonkers, which he said was his deepest play. But Neil Simon was better known for being funny.

Adrienne Arsht Center

One actress in South Florida is aiming to show people what it's like to be a Latina. 

There are no costume changes and 24 Latina characters in ¡FUÁCATA! or a Latina’s Guide to Surviving the Universe -- all played by Cuban-American actress Elena María García, who was raised in Broward. The idea is that whether audience members are from South America, Central America, Cuba, Puerto Rico or Mexico, they'll be able to relate.

Associated Press

Members of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School's drama team stole the show at the 72nd Annual Tony Awards Sunday night.

The performance brought the crowd— many of whom were wiping tears from their eyes— to its collective feet at the Radio City Music Hall in New York City. The surprise showing wasn't part of that afternoon's dress rehearsal.

The Tony Awards felt a little different this year than they have recently. It was a year without a Hamilton or a Dear Evan Hansen; there was no one original, out-of-nowhere show that came into the Tony Awards as a pop phenomenon. In fact, all four of the four nominated musicals were adaptations of existing properties: SpongeBob SquarePants, Disney's Frozen and the non-musical films Mean Girls and The Band's Visit.

Courtesy of Harry Castiblanco

Since January, the Teatro Trail in Little Havana has been showing the play, “Tres Viudas en un Crucero” (“Three Widows on a Cruise”), to sold-out crowds. The Spanish-language production featured a blackface character. A fair-skinned actress wore brown face makeup and overdrawn big red lips.

 

The theater recently decided to eliminate blackface from the play after an El Nuevo Herald report denouncing it. 

Harrison School for the Arts

Floridians have mythologized Publix. The supermarket is celebrated for its Pub Subs, chicken tenders, sappy commercials and catchy slogans.

The two most-nominated shows at this year's Tony Awards might sound familiar, even to those who don't keep an eye on Broadway: Mean Girls, based on the 2004 movie, and SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical, based on the long-running animated TV show, each earned a dozen nominations.

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