trauma

Nadege Green / WLRN

Immediately after the Marjory Stoneman Douglas shooting, counselors and therapists were available in local parks.  But since that public showing of mental health support, students and their families continue to struggle with the trauma of what happened.

Stephanie Colombini / WUSF Public Media

Throughout the second week after the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that left  17 people dead, experts sent by the Israeli government hosted a series of trauma training sessions in Broward County for teachers, counselors and other members of the community who were coping with the violence.

 

Courtesy

Senate Minority Leader Oscar Braynon wants to create a $10 million program that would reimburse trauma centers for care provided to victims of mass shootings, and Senate President Joe Negron said he will support the effort. 

Braynon wants to create a fund in the Attorney General’s Office, with money coming from a portion of fees collected from new or renewed concealed-weapons licenses. The program would reimburse trauma centers that treat victims of mass shootings, such as the Feb. 14 attack at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland that left 17 people dead. 

"Trauma" is a heavy and haunting word. For many Americans, it conjures images of troops returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. The emotional toll from those wars made headlines and forced a healthcare reckoning at the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Dr. Nadine Burke Harris, a pediatrician, would like to see a similar reckoning in every doctor's office, health clinic and classroom in America — for children who have experienced trauma much closer to home.

If you know anything about New Orleans public schools, you probably know this: Hurricane Katrina wiped them out and almost all the schools became privately run charters.

Many of those schools subscribed to the no excuses discipline model — the idea that if you crack down on slight misbehavior, you can prevent bigger issues from erupting.

After high school, Staff Sgt. Kimi wanted to go to art school, but she didn't have the money. So she joined the military.

Intelligence analysts like Kimi work with drone pilots and others in the Air Force to guide decisions about where to deploy weapons in the fight against ISIS and al-Qaida. (The U.S. Air Force won't release her last name because of the high-security work she does).

I spent an alarmingly large chunk of 1989 trying to align a falling shower of digital building blocks into perfect rows of 10.

The Russian video game Tetris had just caught on in the States. Like many American children, I was rapt.

Plenty of video games are all-immersive, yet there was a particular 8-bit entrancement to Tetris — something about the simplicity and repetition of rotating descending blocks so they snugly fit together that allowed a complete dissociation from self, and from parental provocations ("Maybe, uh, go do something outside?").

Christine DiMattei

Once their tours of duty are over, war veterans sometimes have trouble readjusting to civilian life. But a program in Broward County uses art as a way to help vets cope with the trauma.

For the past few weeks, the Coral Springs Museum of Art has been hosting free sessions for veterans of all ages. They’re encouraged to express themselves however they choose -- with paints, colored pencils, collage or even poetry.

The Trauma of Everyday Life

Sep 16, 2013
www.facebook.com/pages/Mark-Epstein-MD/201450013207216

09/16/13 - Monday’s Topical Currents is with psychiatrist Dr. Mark Epstein.  He’s written THE TRAUMA OF EVERYDAY LIFE.  Most of us have a limited – and limiting – understanding of trauma.   Epstein says trauma is more than death, chronic illness or cataclysmic life events in the news . . . that it isn’t a rare event . . . but is central to our psychological makeup.

Facing Cancer and Maintaining Emotional Wellness

May 1, 2013

05/01/13 - Wednesday's Topical Currents examines what everyone fears:  a cancer diagnosis. Whether it’s one’s self, a loved one or dear friend, life’s outlook is immediately changed and prioritized. We’ll visit with two authors who write about cancer diagnosis, the fear of death, and our emotional wellness when faced with such a trauma.

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