undocumented immigrants

The lunch rush is over at a popular, cozy restaurant in a city somewhere in Missouri. The owner, Lynn, is sipping a glass of pinot grigio as her cooking crew cleans up.

Like thousands of other restaurants across America, Lynn's kitchen is staffed mainly with unauthorized Latino workers. She agreed to openly discuss this employment conundrum if NPR agreed not to give her last name, identify her restaurant, name the city, or even specify the type of cuisine. Like a lot of employers these days, she doesn't want to attract the attention of federal immigration agents.

MIAMI HERALD

Federal immigration agents are beefing up their efforts to apprehend undocumented immigrants in South Florida as part of a nationwide effort to “keep communities safe” away from land borders.

The target: transportation hubs.

In the past few weeks, Customs and Border Patrol officials have been spotted by commuters at Greyhound bus stations across Miami-Dade and Broward counties, asking riders on board, or in the process of boarding a bus, for proof of legal status.

A day after U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers arrested nearly 700 people in sweeping raids at several food-processing plants in Mississippi, officials said Thursday that nearly half of those detained had already been released.

Wesley Memorial United Methodist Church doesn't outwardly attract much attention. The small brick building is situated in the middle of Charlottesville, Va., across the street from the University of Virginia's campus. But over the past ten months, the church has become emblematic of the city's immigration activism, since it became home to an undocumented woman avoiding deportation.

The Trump administration announced on Monday it is expanding fast-track deportation regulations to include the removal of undocumented immigrants who cannot prove they have been in the U.S. continuously for two years or more.

The Trump administration wants to scale back a program that protects undocumented family members of active-duty troops from being deported, according to attorneys familiar with those plans.

The attorneys are racing to submit applications for what is known as parole in place after hearing from the wives and loved ones of deployed soldiers who have been told that option is "being terminated."

Chris Persaud / Palm Beach Post

Ruth Funes tried for a year to open her own bank account but kept getting denied. The bank rejected the photo ID she brought with her from Honduras when she moved to the United States in 2004, she said, “My husband opened a (joint) account with me.”

Gov. DeSantis Signs A Ban On 'Sanctuary Cities'

Jun 14, 2019
Scott Keeler / Associated Press

Saying that “we’re delivering on the promises that we made to the people of Florida,” Gov. Ron DeSantis on Friday signed a fiercely debated bill that bans so-called “sanctuary cities” in the state.

Miami Herald Archive

Rubman Ardon Chinchilla, a roofer and father of three who has lived illegally in the United States for decades, used a phony immigration document to get a Florida driver’s license, a crime agents say was organized by a conman posing as a government officer.

Chinchilla was one of more than 20 undocumented immigrants arrested a few months ago for using a specific federal form — known as an “Order of Supervision” — to prove to the Florida Department of Motor Vehicles and Highway Safety that he was allowed to be in the United States.

When migrant children cross the border without their parents, they're sent to federal shelters until caseworkers can find them a good home. But everything changes when they turn 18. That's when, in many cases, they're handcuffed and locked up in an adult detention facility. The practice is sparking lawsuits and outrage from immigrant advocates.

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

The last thing senior paralegal Karen Leicht ever imagined was that she would serve three years in prison for a felony charge.

“It is a huge skeleton in the closet,” Leicht said after speaking on a panel organized by  the Greater Miami Chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), the Miami branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and a group of public defenders at the Palmetto Bay public library on Sunday.

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

South Florida activist groups held a march and blocked traffic Wednesday near the U.S. Immigration Customs and Enforcement field office in Miramar.

The group blocked streets at the intersection of SW 29th Street and 145th Avenue for hours.

One patient's death changed the course of Dr. Lilia Cervantes' career. The patient, Cervantes says, was a woman from Mexico with kidney failure who repeatedly visited the emergency room for more than three years. In that time, her heart had stopped more than once, and her ribs were fractured from CPR. The woman finally decided to stop treatment because the stress was too much for her and her two young children. Cervantes says she died soon after.

Felix Marquez / AP via Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

I’ve learned to think like President Trump. That should probably scare the hell out of me, but journalists get paid for that kind of thing.

It was Tuesday when I knew I was finally on the same page with the man. That’s because my head didn’t do a 360 like Linda Blair’s in “The Exorcist” when he said he was thinking of cutting off U.S. aid to Honduras.

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