University of Florida

Miami Herald

University of Florida students hoping to empty the auditorium for white nationalist Richard Spencer’s speech and get free beer in the process are out of luck.

Getty Images via Miami Herald

The University of Florida signaled that white nationalist Richard Spencer will be allowed to rent space on campus — but at a new date yet to be determined.

The move, announced Friday, came as the university faced a First Amendment lawsuit over a controversial event originally planned for Sept. 12.

University of Florida officials say a group headed by white nationalist Richard Spencer is threatening legal action after the school refused to rent it space on campus for a September event.

The University of Florida is cancelling a rally scheduled for September led by white nationalist Richard Spencer. But one of Spencer's supporters may be willing to take that up in court.

UF President Kent Fuchs released a statement Wednesday calling Spencer's rhetoric racist and repugnant. In that statement, Fuchs says the university decided to cancel the event due to safety concerns for the students on campus.

But Cameron Padgett, who helped organize the event, is threatening the university with a lawsuit to allow Spencer to speak.

Associated Press

The University of Florida is coordinating with local and state law-enforcement officials in anticipation of the potential appearance in Gainesville of a white nationalist leader affiliated with this weekend's deadly confrontation in Charlottesville, Va.

UF President Kent Fuchs sent an email to staff this weekend, alerting them that National Policy Institute President Richard Spencer, who made an appearance at the Charlottesville event, could speak at the university next month.

As the University of Florida’s Citrus Research and Education Center prepares to celebrate its centennial anniversary, researchers there say that they’re on the cusp of developing a cure to the most serious threat facing the citrus industry worldwide:  citrus greening. 

Two recent college graduates have decided to sue the state for skipping out on school payments.

National Parks Service

New research shows for at least 8 million years the American alligator has remained virtually unchanged by evolution, making it among the world’s oldest species.

 

The species may be up to 6 million years older than previously thought.

The University of Florida research shows the American alligator is much older than humans, who only are a few hundred-thousand years old.

Lead researcher Evan Whiting says only a few sharks and other species are as old as alligators.

THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA / WUSF

Professors from the University of Florida have developed a mosquito trap that they say could help prevent the spread of Zika virus.  

Professor Phil Koehler says the trap is proven to catch and kill mosquitos but the public might not be able use it this summer because it’s awaiting federal approval.

The professors have applied for emergency registration from the Environmental Protection Agency, which could bring it to the public in a matter of weeks instead of almost a year. Koehler said he’s hoping to have it approved for this mosquito season.   

An appeals court ruled Friday that state universities are allowed to ban students from having guns in their dorm rooms.

The University of Florida wants funding from the state legislature to expand a statewide book-sharing system it manages for all academic libraries. The book collection is known as FLARE—it stands for the Florida Academic Repository. UF is asking for about $19 million.

University of Florida

One look at the Brazilian flag and you think: This must be a space-age, high-tech country. That star-spackled orb in the middle glowing like a planetarium. The banner wrapped around it hailing “Order and Progress.” Engineers must be rock stars there, right?

President Obama Delays Immigration Action

Sep 12, 2014

On the Florida Roundup, President Obama will not take executive action on immigration until after the midterm elections, breaking a pledge he made in June. We will discuss how this will affect votes in our swing state.

The Guatemalan-Maya Center, Lake Worth

The Maya have many cool nicknames. The Greeks of the New World. Men of Maize. But you can add a more unfortunate moniker – the Children of Scorched Earth – to explain why they’re suddenly one of Florida’s fastest-growing immigrant communities.

The Maya are the largest indigenous group in the Americas, descendants of the glorious pre-Columbian civilization that occupied southern Mexico and northern Central America. Most live in Guatemala – where in recent decades they’ve faced one violent plague after another.

Laura Coburn / WLRN

One of the beauties of living here is you can grow your own herbs, food and flowers year 'round -- and landscape your home yourself. (There are classes at Miami Dade College, Fairchild Tropical Gardens and the University of Florida Agricultural Extension office in the Redland addressing these interests as well as specializations like growing mangos, palms or your own organic vegetable garden.)

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