University of Miami

Grif Helwig / Miami Herald

Anglers have long theorized that the mighty tarpon, a brawny fish that draws anglers from around the world as part of a $6 billion U.S. sportfishing industry, migrated vast distances in search of warm water and food.

Now, a new study drawing on two decades worth of tracking data shows just how far: across the Gulf of Mexico to the Yucatan.

EMILY MICHOT / Miami Herald

In the text of the ordinance authorizing a needle exchange in Broward County, commissioners ticked off a list of alarming public health statistics: 1,642 opioid overdoses in 2017, more than 21,000 people living with HIV, 387 heroin- and fentanyl-related deaths in 2018.

Needle exchanges are designed to prevent the spread of infectious diseases among drug users by providing clean syringes and help reverse opioid overdoses by distributing naloxone directly to people who use drugs, as well as offering them access to other services like testing for hepatitis.

For decades, Bruce Bagley has been regarded as a leading expert on organized crime in Latin America, particularly on money laundering. Now, the University of Miami professor is in trouble for the way he may have applied that knowledge.

Bagley was arrested Monday on charges of laundering $3 million on behalf of corrupt foreign nationals who collected the illicit funds through bribes and by embezzling from a public works project in Venezuela.

GDA via AP Images

A University of Miami professor who studies organized crime and drug cartels was accused Monday of engaging in a plot to launder millions in dirty money from Venezuela.

Federal prosecutors in New York announced Bruce Bagley, 73, was indicted on charges of money laundering and conspiracy after he “opened bank accounts for the express purpose of laundering money for corrupt foreign nationals.”

Bagley is a longtime UM international relations professor who wrote the book “Drug Trafficking, Organized Crime, and Violence in the Americas Today.”

Willie Taggart Fired As FSU Football Coach

Nov 4, 2019

Florida State has fired Willie Taggart, the move coming a day after the Seminoles lost to rival Miami and with the team in danger of missing a bowl for the second consecutive season.

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

Starting with next fall's freshman class, the University of Miami will take steps to meet the financial need of all admitted undergraduate students who live in Florida, with the exception of immigrants who are not here legally.

The school's new plan, called "UM Within Reach," guarantees meeting the "demonstrated financial need" of admitted Floridians who are eligible for federal aid — meaning, they're U.S. citizens. The plan would also apply to all students who are accepted through the early admission program, which is binding.

Matias J. Ocner

Colombian president Iván Duque will speak Saturday morning at Florida International University’s Wertheim Theater.

The speech comes on the heels of Duque’s escalating condemnation of the Venezuelan regime.

At the U.N. General Assembly this week, the U.S. and Latin American countries denounced Venezuela for aiding criminal groups in Colombia.

Emily Michot Miami Herald

A King Tide forecast for the weekend could bring flooding to parts of South Florida.

The tide is expected to peak Sunday and Monday mornings between about 9 and 10 a.m. and may approach record highs as the moon sweeps closer to the earth.

"They do look like they'll be roughly comparable to the highest tide we saw in 2015 and 2016, which were pretty noteworthy," said Brian McNoldy, a hurricane researcher who tracks the tides at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science.

Victor R. Caivano / AP

Last week Brazilian soldiers were working to put out this year’s record number of fires in the Amazon rainforest. The irony is that they were there on the orders of their commander-in-chief, President Jair Bolsonaro – because he’s trying to put out another kind of fire.

"If you're a full time student, about $2,400 a year."

"Roughly, $3,400 a semester."

"All in, it's about $50,000."

That’s just the range of tuition across three schools in South Florida — Broward College, Florida International University and the University of Miami — as described by their leaders.

 

NASA via AP

The haunting pictures of smoke in Brazil this week have made the world aware of the emergency level of Amazon deforestation. Brazil experts here warn South Floridians this crisis is not as distant as it seems.

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

Tony Varona immigrated to the United States from Cuba as a small child. Growing up in Newark, New Jersey, he was the only person in his family who spoke English.

“I was called upon to be the family translator and to be the family representative. Whenever anybody needed to go to the immigration office or the Social Security office, I went with them,” he said. “That experience taught me about advocacy.”

Varona also navigated what he called the 'challenging task' of coming out as gay as a working-class Cuban immigrant in Newark.

University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science

Thanks to research done at the University of Miami, we know the epic dust clouds that drift out of North Africa may sometimes prevent hurricanes. (They block the solar energy those cyclones need to form out in the Atlantic.) Now UM scientists have made another discovery linking Africa and the Americas – and this time it’s about smoke. They’ve found that fire smoke from southern Africa also floats our way and has a big, often beneficial impact on the Amazon rainforest and our oceans.

Sammy Mack / WLRN News

The University of Miami is leading a national study of aging people with HIV. Researchers will explore the impacts of non-infectious conditions, such as cardiovascular and pulmonary disease, on both women and men with HIV.

YouTube

During heavy rains last year in a small town outside Havana, people saw something remarkable. Large freshwater catfish called claria were swimming in the flooded streets. In a video posted on YouTube, excited locals splash out to grab them.

But that happy scene was also an environmental alert. Claria are an invasive species in Cuba. They’re supposed to be confined to aquaculture fisheries, where they’re bred for food. Outside those farms – as these claria obviously were – they’re notorious for devouring anything in their paths.

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