University of Miami

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

Starting with next fall's freshman class, the University of Miami will take steps to meet the financial need of all admitted undergraduate students who live in Florida, with the exception of immigrants who are not here legally.

The school's new plan, called "UM Within Reach," guarantees meeting the "demonstrated financial need" of admitted Floridians who are eligible for federal aid — meaning, they're U.S. citizens. The plan would also apply to all students who are accepted through the early admission program, which is binding.

Matias J. Ocner

Colombian president Iván Duque will speak Saturday morning at Florida International University’s Wertheim Theater.

The speech comes on the heels of Duque’s escalating condemnation of the Venezuelan regime.

At the U.N. General Assembly this week, the U.S. and Latin American countries denounced Venezuela for aiding criminal groups in Colombia.

Emily Michot Miami Herald

A King Tide forecast for the weekend could bring flooding to parts of South Florida.

The tide is expected to peak Sunday and Monday mornings between about 9 and 10 a.m. and may approach record highs as the moon sweeps closer to the earth.

"They do look like they'll be roughly comparable to the highest tide we saw in 2015 and 2016, which were pretty noteworthy," said Brian McNoldy, a hurricane researcher who tracks the tides at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science.

Victor R. Caivano / AP

Last week Brazilian soldiers were working to put out this year’s record number of fires in the Amazon rainforest. The irony is that they were there on the orders of their commander-in-chief, President Jair Bolsonaro – because he’s trying to put out another kind of fire.

"If you're a full time student, about $2,400 a year."

"Roughly, $3,400 a semester."

"All in, it's about $50,000."

That’s just the range of tuition across three schools in South Florida — Broward College, Florida International University and the University of Miami — as described by their leaders.

 

NASA via AP

The haunting pictures of smoke in Brazil this week have made the world aware of the emergency level of Amazon deforestation. Brazil experts here warn South Floridians this crisis is not as distant as it seems.

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

Tony Varona immigrated to the United States from Cuba as a small child. Growing up in Newark, New Jersey, he was the only person in his family who spoke English.

“I was called upon to be the family translator and to be the family representative. Whenever anybody needed to go to the immigration office or the Social Security office, I went with them,” he said. “That experience taught me about advocacy.”

Varona also navigated what he called the 'challenging task' of coming out as gay as a working-class Cuban immigrant in Newark.

University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science

Thanks to research done at the University of Miami, we know the epic dust clouds that drift out of North Africa may sometimes prevent hurricanes. (They block the solar energy those cyclones need to form out in the Atlantic.) Now UM scientists have made another discovery linking Africa and the Americas – and this time it’s about smoke. They’ve found that fire smoke from southern Africa also floats our way and has a big, often beneficial impact on the Amazon rainforest and our oceans.

Sammy Mack / WLRN News

The University of Miami is leading a national study of aging people with HIV. Researchers will explore the impacts of non-infectious conditions, such as cardiovascular and pulmonary disease, on both women and men with HIV.

YouTube

During heavy rains last year in a small town outside Havana, people saw something remarkable. Large freshwater catfish called claria were swimming in the flooded streets. In a video posted on YouTube, excited locals splash out to grab them.

But that happy scene was also an environmental alert. Claria are an invasive species in Cuba. They’re supposed to be confined to aquaculture fisheries, where they’re bred for food. Outside those farms – as these claria obviously were – they’re notorious for devouring anything in their paths.

University of Miami Center for Civic and Community Engagement

A new tool created by the University of Miami Center for Civic and Community Engagement identifies potential land around Miami-Dade County that can be used for affordable housing. Called LAND, which stands for "Land Access for Neighborhood Development," it identifies parcels of empty or underutilized land. 

Alejandra Martinez / WLRN

Mark Richt announced his retirement as the head coach for the University of Miami football program last December and the school didn't waste time looking for his replacement. There was only one name that mattered and he had just taken a job as the head coach at Temple.

Ariana Cubillos / AP via Miami Herald

On Thursday Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro will be sworn in after his unconstitutional re-election. Much of the world considers his socialist regime a dictatorship – and a disastrous one: Venezuela is suffering the worst economic collapse in the world right now.

But is it also a dangerous one? Lately the U.S. and much of Latin America are calling Venezuela an erratic security threat. It's escalating tensions with its neighbors – and last month welcomed Russian bomber planes into the country.

To understand what's going on with Venezuela, WLRN’s Tim Padgett spoke with Bruce Bagley, a University of Miami international studies professor and an expert on South American security issues.

Who Is Manny Diaz? A Closer Look At The New Miami Hurricanes Head Football Coach

Dec 31, 2018
Al Diaz / Miami Herald

Within a span of 12 hours, the Miami Hurricanes went from announcing that their head football coach was retiring to naming a familiar face as his replacement.

Out is Mark Richt, who stepped down Sunday after 18 years as a head coach, including the past three at his alma mater UM.

His replacement: Manny Diaz, Richt’s defensive coordinator all three years at Miami who had accepted the head coaching job at Temple earlier this month on Dec. 12.

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

Immigrant caravans – and family separation. Venezuela and Nicaragua rocked by refugee and human rights crises. Someone not named Castro becoming president of Cuba; Brazil and Mexico electing populists as presidents – one of them with a big reputation for sexism. But women surging big at the polls, too.

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