U.S. citizenship

BILL OXFORD GETTY IMAGES / ISTOCKPHOTO

Starting Monday, low-income immigrants will be at a greater risk of being denied a visa or a green card.

The Trump administration’s new “public charge rule” will keep people who need benefits like food stamps, housing vouchers, Supplemental Social Security Income and Medicaid from getting their green cards because they’d be considered a “financial burden” to the U.S.

However, there are still certain people who receive public benefits are exempt from being impacted under the law, according to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

The State Department plans to deny tourist visas to pregnant women if officials believe they are traveling here to secure American citizenship for their child by giving birth on U.S. soil.

The Trump administration says it is targeting the practice known as "birth tourism." The State Department says that traveling to deliver a child in the U.S. is not "a legitimate activity for pleasure or of a recreational nature."

Updated at 6:15 p.m. ET

The citizenship question the Trump administration wanted to add to the 2020 census would have likely been especially sensitive in areas with higher shares of Latinx residents and noncitizens. That's among the Census Bureau's final conclusions from its recent experiment testing public reaction to the question.

MIAMI HERALD

Miami resident María del Carmen Nieto woke up early Sunday morning with a mission in mind: fight for her son.

She was one of more than a 100 protesters who gathered this weekend at the Cuban Memorial Park, located at 999 SW 13th Ave., to demand the government reinstate the Cuban Family Reunification Parole Program, which came to a sudden halt in September 2017, after about two dozen employees in the U.S. embassy in Havana experienced serious illnesses, and the Trump administration withdrew nearly 60% of the diplomatic personnel in the island.

Months after the end of the legal battle over the now-blocked citizenship question, the trail of emails and internal memos about the Trump administration's push to include the question on the 2020 census is getting longer.

Updated at 4:22 p.m. ET

Three women and six children were killed in an attack on members of a Mormon family as they traveled in Mexico on Monday, according to Mexican officials. Relatives say all of those killed were U.S. citizens, and authorities in the state of Sonora say the group was "ambushed by a group of armed people."

SHURAN HUANG / NPR

A new program by Catalyst Miami, a nonprofit social services organization, is offering people applying for citizenship zero-interest loans to cover the costs of the application process.

Updated Oct. 24 at 9:39 a.m. ET

The Census Bureau is asking states to voluntarily share driver's license records as part of the Trump administration's efforts to produce detailed data about the U.S. citizenship status of every person living in the country.

MATIAS J. OCNER / Miami Herald

Boca Raton’s Naomi Osaka, two-time Grand Slam champion and the world’s third-ranked tennis player, has decided to give up her U.S. citizenship to represent Japan in the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo,

Osaka, who is of Japanese and Haitian descent, was born in Japan before moving to South Florida in 2006 from New York, where she lived starting in 2000.

Japan’s Nationality Act states that those who hold dual citizenship must choose one nationality before their 22nd birthday. Osaka turns 22 on Wednesday.

Earlier this year, the State Department quietly rolled out new limits on one of President Trump's favorite targets: the diversity visa lottery.

The White House made ending the program one of the "pillars" of its immigration policy proposal last year. But those proposals went nowhere on Capitol Hill.

So the administration tried something different: It is restricting who can apply for the diversity visa, in a way that advocates say will make it much harder for low-income immigrants to apply.

The children of some U.S. military members and government workers overseas will have a harder time getting citizenship under a Trump administration policy announced Wednesday.

The changes will affect a relatively small number of people. But the announcement touched off widespread confusion and outrage — with immigrant and veterans' advocates questioning why the administration would change the rules for people who are serving their country.

With the legal fight to block a citizenship question from the 2020 census behind them, immigrant rights groups and other advocates are now turning toward what they consider an even greater challenge — getting every person living in the U.S. counted.

JOE RAEDLE / Getty Images

For one South Florida man, half a million dollars couldn’t cut it.

In order for the U.S. citizen to bring his parents from overseas on immigrant visas, the Department of State wanted proof that he had at least four times the required amount. In his case, federal law says the man only needed to show $220,000 in assets, but the U.S. demanded proof of $1 million.

Updated at 7:05 p.m. ET

The House of Representatives approved a resolution Tuesday evening condemning the president for a series of racist tweets about four Democratic lawmakers.

The vote was mostly along party lines, as the House split 240-187, with four Republicans supporting the nonbinding measure.

Associated Press

On Sunday, President Trump tweeted that four first-year Democratic members of Congress should all "go back" where they came from. The president's comments were aimed at representatives who are women of color — all of them American citizens, three of them born in the U.S. 

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