Venezuela

Leonardo Fernandez / AP

Over the weekend, Venezuelan opposition leaders warned the country's regime was poised to shut down the National Assembly. That hasn't happened — but something just as distressing to pro-democracy advocates is taking place.

JUAN BARRETO / AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Venezuela’s Nicolás Maduro regime continued lashing out after it was hit with punishing economic sanctions earlier this month, charging three opposition lawmakers with treason and other crimes.

But the country’s leadership stopped short of dissolving the National Assembly — the Venezuelan equivalent of Congress — or calling early legislative elections as some had feared.

On Monday, the country’s Supreme Court — dominated by ruling party judges — accused three opposition congressmen of treason, conspiracy and rebellion, among other charges.

Fernando Llano / AP

The interim president of Venezuela, Juan Guaidó, warned Sunday night that the Nicolás Maduro regime plans to dissolve the National Assembly in the next few hours in reaction to the sanctions imposed by Washington on the Venezuelan economy.

Guaidó, whose presidency is recognized by the United States and more than fifty other nations, said the country is at the gates of a new stage of repression that could lead to the massive arrest of the assembly’s deputies. Guaidó is the leader of the assembly.

MASS COMMUNICATION SPECIALIST 2ND CLASS MORGAN K. NALL / U.S. NAVAL FORCES SOUTHERN COMMAND

Medical staff aboard the U.S. Navy’s hospital ship Comfort said they are seeing a surge of patients who fled Venezuela on recent port stops in Ecuador, Peru, Costa Rica and Panama, where it was docked Thursday.

“I would say 25 to 30 percent of the patients I see in these primary clinics are Venezuelan migrants,” said Navy medic Lt. Cmdr. Jean Fortunado.

Martin Chahin / DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

The U.S. is working with Colombia, Brazil and other regional partners on how to assist Venezuela if the embargo-like sanctions announced by the White House this week ultimately force President Nicolás Maduro to step down, the head of the U.S. Southern Command said.

Navy Adm. Craig Faller, the Miami-based head of U.S. forces in South America, said the nations are working on “planning and discussing what we could do, and will do for the ‘day after Maduro,’ when there’s a legitimate government, when we can go in and really assist the people of Venezuela.”

Fernando Vergara / AP

COMMENTARY

On Local 10’s “This Week in South Florida” last Sunday – a day after the anti-immigrant/anti-Hispanic massacre in El Paso, Texas – I used the term “white Christianist terrorism” to describe the wave of white supremacist violence plaguing the U.S.

Martin Mejia / AP

Monday night the Trump Administration announced it was slapping a “full economic embargo” on Venezuela. But the U.S.’s latest move against the socialist regime in Caracas isn’t quite what it’s being billed as.

JOSÉ A. IGLESIAS / MIAMI HERALD

President Donald Trump late Monday signed an executive order imposing a harsh, Cuba-style economic embargo on Venezuela as part of Washington’s broad push to force leader Nicolás Maduro out of power.

In a letter to Congress, Trump said the measure was necessary in light of Maduro’s “continued usurpation of power” and ongoing human rights abuses in the South American nation.

The new measures are expected to be announced Tuesday, as representatives from dozens of countries will be meeting in Peru to discuss the Venezuela crisis.

The White House is on the verge of taking steps to protect thousands of Venezuelans living in the United States from deportation, even as it finds new ways to restrict the ability of asylum-seekers from other countries to claim refuge in the U.S.

Ismael Francisco / AP

Cuba's economy continues to sink. In the past year the island has seen increasing food shortages, utility outages and fuel scarcity. On Thursday Cuba's communist government took a drastic step. But it's one that economists say could backfire.

Carolyn Kaster / AP

COMMENTARY

During the Cold War, the U.S. quip about almost any Latin American dictator was that “he may be a son of a bitch, but he’s our son of a bitch.”

PEDRO PORTAL / MIAMI HERALD

The U.S. is a step closer to granting Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Venezuelans.

JOSÉ A. IGLESIAS / MIAMI HERALD

The House of Representatives passed a bill to grant Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for Venezuelans, the most significant legislative action to date in response to Venezuela’s humanitarian crisis.

The TPS bill, sponsored by Florida Reps. Mario Diaz-Balart, R-Miami, and Darren Soto, D-Kissimmee, heads to the U.S. Senate for consideration a day before the House leaves Washington for a six week recess.

The bill passed by a vote of 272-158, with 39 Republicans and one independent joining 232 Democrats in favor.

TPS For Venezuelans Blocked By House Republicans

Jul 24, 2019
PEDRO PORTAL / MIAMI HERALD

Republicans voted down a bill Tuesday that would provide Temporary Protected Status for Venezuelans, a setback for South Florida lawmakers from both parties.

Democrats needed GOP support for a bill sponsored by Reps. Darren Soto, D-Kissimmee, and Mario Diaz-Balart, R-Miami, after they fast-tracked the measure to force a vote before the House of Representatives leaves for its summer recess at the end of the week. The fast-tracking meant the bill needed two-thirds support instead of a simple majority to pass.

PEDRO PORTAL / MIAMI HERALD

The city of Miami and members of Venezuela's opposition will host a 5k run this Sunday to support humanitarian efforts led by opposition leader Juan Guaido.

Mayor Francis Suarez announced the "Running for Freedom" race yesterday.

They will raise funds to send medical supplies and medicine to Venezuela, which has already been dealing with food and medical shortages.

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