voting

Jaylan Scott was in the middle of planning an upcoming event for the Young Democrats of Georgia when he found out his state's primary was postponed.

"It was pretty much a shocker for me," the Georgia State University sophomore said. "It was a shocker for everybody."

Scott first voted in the 2018 midterm elections but has yet to participate in a presidential election. He's a supporter of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, but says he'll vote for former Vice President Joe Biden if he is the Democratic nominee.

Sherrilyn Cabrera / WLRN

Florida is holding its primary Tuesday as the state battles COVID-19, but only some South Florida voters are choosing to head to the polls. 

“We're definitely voting. They voted during the Civil War. We're gonna vote,” Gov. Ron DeSantis said in a press conference last week. 

WLRN has been hearing from listeners on social media from Palm Beach, Broward, Miami-Dade and Monroe counties who are choosing to take precautions during voting or not vote at all. 

While much of the country has come to a standstill because of the rapidly spreading coronavirus, democracy, it seems, goes on.

Four states are set to hold their presidential primaries on Tuesday, and many more states and territories are currently scheduled to vote before the end of April.

Here are answers to three questions you may have about voting in the time of a pandemic.

1. Are elections still happening?

Updated at 5:05 p.m. ET

Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden have canceled their respective rallies tonight in Cleveland, Ohio, with the campaigns citing public health concerns amid the coronavirus outbreak.

The big picture on election security in the 2020 campaign after Super Tuesday: could be worse — but also could be better.

The biggest day of voting so far in this year's race wasn't problem-free: Officials dealt with problems in Texas, California and North Carolina, plus tornadoes disrupted the vote in middle Tennessee.

Group Campaigns For Sen. Elizabeth Warren In Miami

Mar 1, 2020
Maria Esquinca

Officials gathered to discuss why they support Senator Elizabeth Warren for the presidency at an event called “Cafecito Con Warren” at Gramps bar in Miami on Saturday. 

About two dozen people packed the room inside Gramps. Posters like “Demócrata por Warren” and “Latinx With Warren” were plastered on the walls. Tomas Alcala, Statewide Latino Constituency Director for the Warren Campaign, offered cafecitos to attendees while Salsa music like “Bang Bang” by the Joe Cuba Sextet played over the speakers.

The Democratic presidential nominating contest now heads into a critical phase.

The candidates have so far stood for elections in two of the whitest states in the country, Iowa and New Hampshire. But Nevada and South Carolina — the next two states to vote — will provide far more diverse electorates.

MIAMI HERALD STAFF

Florida Democrats will be voting in the presidential primary next month -- and it remains a tight race.

The Iowa caucus results came in days after voting, and there have been several reports of inaccuracies.

 

Daniel Rivero / WLRN

On an afternoon in November, 17 people from across Miami-Dade County gathered in a Miami courtroom to have their voting rights restored. The hearing would be an early indication that party politics are playing a role in how a controversial state law is being rolled out.

Florida’s application has been approved for membership in a program that allows exchanging voter-related data with other states, an effort long-sought by county supervisors of elections, Gov. Ron DeSantis announced Wednesday.

Associated Press

Around this time last year, the political sphere zeroed in on Broward County, which was dealing with a crucial recount in a couple of statewide races. The office has recently dealt with another blunder, according to the South Florida Sun Sentinel. More than 50,000 voters received a “final notice” mailer that threatened to designate them inactive voters. 

For decades, the cybersecurity community has had a consistent message: Mixing the Internet and voting is a horrendous idea.

"I believe that's about the worst thing you can do in terms of election security in America, short of putting American ballot boxes on a Moscow street," howled Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., on the Senate floor this year.

Election supervisors are reminding Floridians: Signatures change over time.

Madeline Fox / WLRN

Tuesday is National Voter Registration Day, and marks a cross-country effort to encourage citizens to get ready to exercise their right to vote.

With five months before primary season begins, election officials around the country are busy buying new voting equipment.

Their main focus is security, after Russians tried to hack into U.S. election systems in 2016. Intelligence officials have warned that similar attacks are likely in 2020, from either Russia or others intent on disrupting U.S. elections.

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