voting

Colorofchangepac.org

The Color of Change political action committee (PAC) has launched #VotingWhileBlack, a program to engage black voters in races that may have the strongest impact on their communities.

PAC Director Arisha Hatch says elected officials often pursue black voters then forget about black communities once they take office. So the program is designed to hold politicians accountable for promises made on the campaign trail.

When Estelle Schultz, 98, sealed her ballot for the 2016 election, she wanted to snap a photo to commemorate.

She sent it to her granddaughter Sarah Benor, who says she was moved to post the picture on Facebook. Like many posts during this election, it went viral.

Here's a little information that Americans have usually been able to ignore.

It's about the Electoral College, a uniquely American institution that's been with us from the beginning and that's occasionally given us fits.

Typically, the Electoral College meets and does its thing a month or so after the election, and few people even notice or care. Once in a while, though, people do notice and do care — a lot.

Will 2016 be one of those years?

It's not something reasonable people would hope for, but it cannot be ruled out.

First, the basics.

El Nuevo Herald

There has been a lot of talk of "rigged elections" or "voter fraud" circulating within the electorate in this election Nevertheless, as of today (Monday, Nov. 4) the number of Floridians who have already voted is more than five million.

Christina White, the Supervisor of Elections in Miami-Dade County, says there is no need for fear of voter fraud because the system is built to protect against it. She shares her thoughts on why voters can feel secure, as well as what people can expect on Election Day.

Ahead of Election Day next week, election officials around the country are checking and double-checking their equipment to make sure the results are calculated accurately.

Those officials are under increased scrutiny this year with Donald Trump and his allies claiming the voting system could be "rigged" in favor of Democrats. So election administrators around the country are opening the doors to the public to show off the multiple layers of safeguards in the ballot-counting process.

Thinking of memorializing your vote for the upcoming presidential election? You might want to think twice about that.

Florida is one of 18 states where it's illegal to take a selfie with your mail-in ballot or while you're in the voting booth.

A judge has ruled that Broward County's elections supervisor was doing enough to warn voters about a potential problem with the medical marijuana referendum on their ballots.


Credit Mark Hedden / WLRN

This week on The Florida Roundup...

The State of Florida has budgeted about 12 million dollars to help Miami-Dade County in its efforts to battle Zika and the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Now, Florida's Surgeon General is requesting a comprehensive Zika action plan from the county to detail spending. Mayor Gimenez says he will comply. Does this signify a rift between the state and the county? WLRN's Sammy Mack and The Miami Herald's Daniel Chang fill us in on the latest.

Listen here: 

Speaking at a rally in Tampa, Fla., on Wednesday, Hillary Clinton told the story of a leukemia patient named Steven who "ditched his oxygen tank," as Clinton told it, to vote early.

"If Steven can do that, nobody has any excuses," she chided the crowd.

The Clinton camp is putting a hard push on to turn out the vote before Nov. 8. The number of people taking advantage of early voting could hit record levels this year. Here's a primer on early voting:

1. How many people will vote early this year?

Vote flipping. The stories and conspiracy theories have begun.

In every recent election, there have been reports of voters pressing one candidate's name on a touch-screen machine, only to have the opponent's name light up instead.

It can be unnerving for voters and often leads to allegations that the machines have been "rigged" to favor one candidate over another.

Florida Division of Elections

Florida’s secretary of state has released a voter education toolkit for next month’s 2016 primary election.

The guide has checklists for current and new voters to make sure citizens have everything they need when arriving at a polling location.

This includes making sure you are properly registered with the political party of your choice, checking to be sure your signature is up to date and verifying that  your address is correct.

Eliza Brown/ Flickr

A state Senate redistricting plan favored by voting-rights organizations was approved Wednesday by a Leon County judge in a move that could shake the Republican Party's grip on power in the Capitol.

In choosing the new map, Circuit Judge George Reynolds also rejected a plan put forward by Senate Republican leaders as the best configuration of the chamber's 40 seats. The proposal chosen by Reynolds would lead to a roughly even number of districts favoring each party.

Elections Supervisors Seek Updated Signatures

Dec 29, 2015
Lightblb on Flickr

Hundreds of thousands of registered voters in Florida are being asked to update their signatures.

If the signature on an absentee ballot doesn’t match what the elections office has on file, the vote can be tossed out.

Miami-Dade Supervisor of Elections Penelope Townsley sent letters to nearly 200,000 voters who have previously requested ballots by mail.

Steve Bousquet in the Herald/Times Tallahassee Bureau says absentee voting has become so popular that an effort is underway to re-name it.

via Miami Herald

On election day at the end of a high-profile mayoral race in Miami Beach, Maribel Balbin, president of the League of Women Voters Miami chapter, offered insights on what matters most to Miami voters.

Despite a bumpy and contentious year, the Republican-led Florida Legislature returns to the state Capitol on Monday with the goal of trying to draw up new maps for 40 state Senate districts.

This marks the third special session of the year for legislators, and also marks the third time that lawmakers have altered the boundaries of state Senate districts since 2012. This session is scheduled to last up to 19 days.

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