weather

Hurricanes and cold fronts can both produce hazardous weather in Florida. The good news is they usually can’t coexist.

A formidable tropical wave will be approaching Florida this week, while at the same time an unusually strong mid-summer front will be sliding into the Southeast. The front is forecast to win this battle, sparing Florida and the United States a significant tropical threat.

Invest 94 Unlikely to Develop

A report released this week predicts a lot more days of extreme heat - so much that they're being called "killer heat" days. We conclude our three-part series with a plea from scientists for politicians to do something - before it's too late.

PEDRO PORTAL / MIAMI HERALD

Climate change is making the planet warmer, but a new report says there's something worse on the horizon: extreme heat.

Updated at 8:26 p.m. ET

Though life-threatening flooding still poses a threat to Louisiana, weakening winds on Sunday marked Barry's downgrade from a tropical storm to a tropical depression.

The National Weather Service forecasts that the center of the storm will continue to move through northwest Louisiana toward Arkansas through Monday.

People across southern Louisiana are spending the weekend worried about flooding. The water is coming from every direction: the Mississippi River is swollen with rain that fell weeks ago farther north, and a storm called Barry is pushing ocean water onshore while it drops more rain from above.

It's a situation driven by climate change, and one that Louisiana has never dealt with, at least in recorded history. And it's raising questions about whether New Orleans and other communities are prepared for such an onslaught.

Updated at 4:32 p.m. ET

Barry reached Louisiana's central coast, near Intracoastal City, on Saturday morning as a Category 1 hurricane, the National Hurricane Center said, before weakening to a tropical storm.

The storm has already brought flooding to New Orleans, where tornado warnings have been issued.

Residents across other parts of Louisiana have also been bracing for flooding — forecasters predict up to 25 inches of rain across much of southern Louisiana and southwest Mississippi, leading to dangerous, life threatening flooding.

Updated at 11 p.m. ET

Tropical Storm Barry is beginning to take a toll on the central Gulf Coast, bringing high winds and heavy rains to parts of southeastern Louisiana, where residents have been preparing to cope with flooding and power outages.

As Barry slowly approached land, an oil rig southwest of the mouth of the Mississippi River reported "sustained winds of 76 mph and a wind gust of 87 mph," the National Hurricane Center said Friday.

In New Orleans, officials told residents to get off the streets and shelter in place.

Florida’s Division of Emergency Management is bracing for the potential growth of a storm system expected to move south into the Gulf of Mexico later this week, with particular attention given to Panhandle counties impacted by Hurricane Michael last year.

Heavy rain and potential flooding is in the forecast this week across parts of Florida, and a tropical storm might even form nearby.

Regardless of its tropical status, several inches of rain are likely to fall near Florida’s Gulf Coast this week. Nearby seas will also grow unsettled, with minor coastal flooding and multiple beach hazards expected.

Updated at 5:53 p.m. ET

People in Guadalajara, Mexico, woke up on Sunday to a thick blanket of ice over areas of their city, after a freak hailstorm that damaged houses and left cars partially buried.

This is particularly striking because it's the middle of summer. In the past month, temperatures most days have hit 90 degrees Fahrenheit or over.

Florida Had Hottest May In More Than A Century

Jun 7, 2019

If last month felt hotter than normal, there's a reason. 

Matias J. Ocner Miami Herald

Hurricane forecasting has come a long way since Ken Graham worked the night shift on the Gulf Coast, when warnings about killer storms like Hurricane Andrew came only three days in advance.

Gerald Herbert Associated Press

Hurricane forecasters on Thursday called for a near normal Atlantic season this year following three brutal years that produced hurricanes Maria, Irma, Harvey, Florence and Michael.

Updated Tuesday at 9:30 a.m. ET

Andrea, the first named storm of the 2019 Atlantic season, formed late Monday night, according to a special bulletin from the National Hurricane Center. With maximum sustained winds of 40 mph, the low-powered storm is less than 300 miles west-southwest of Bermuda.

A new round of powerful storms is causing more flooding in multiple states, with parts of the Deep South likely on the receiving end of some of the most severe weather through the end of the week that will impact about 40 million Americans.

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