West Kendall

Pedro Portal / Miami Herald

Marco Rubio announced Tuesday that he will ask federal agencies to oppose the 836 expressway expansion into West Kendall, a major roadblock for Mayor Carlos Gimenez and the Miami-Dade County Commission after they gave preliminary approval for the 14-mile highway in June.

The Republican senator’s alignment with environmentalists, who say the highway would damage the Everglades and cause urban sprawl, could affect the project’s progress due to federal land swaps from the Department of Interior that are needed before construction can begin.

Extension Of 836 Expressway Into Kendall Wins Key Vote In Miami-Dade

Jun 20, 2018
MIAMI HERALD

Miami-Dade commissioners on Wednesday gave preliminary approval to extending the 836 expressway 14 miles into West Kendall, rejecting warnings about environmental damage and urban sprawl in favor of bringing relief to commuters in the congested suburbs.

David Santiago / Miami Herald

A West Kendall charter school received the Miami-Dade County commission's approval Thursday to expand and increase its enrollment. But the go-ahead came with a caveat to limit bringing more traffic into the area.

Green City

The Miami-Dade Planning Advisory Board unanimously rejected the Green City development’s application Monday to build beyond the urban development boundary.

Our Audience Responds To West Kendall Park, Library Renaming

Oct 29, 2015
Maria Murriel / Illustration

Last week, the Miami-Dade County Commission approved the renaming of a library and a park in the suburb of West Kendall. They went from West Kendall to West End Regional Library and West End District Park.

This renaming is part of a multi-year plan by District 11 Commissioner Juan Zapata to create an area called "West End."

We received an overwhelming amount of feedback about this issue, most of it negative. Read some responses in the slideshow at the top of this post.

A Wild Frontier In West Kendall

Nov 1, 2013
Courtesy / Miami Herald

Southwest 132nd Avenue was on the edge of Miami in 1972, when Marily Reyes and her husband Frank moved into their new home just south of Bird Road. Their view across the narrow avenue was elephant grass for six long years.