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Oct. 9 is the last day to register in the state of Florida if you want to vote in the Nov. 6 general elections. It is also the last day to change your address if you have moved since the last time you’ve voted.

Floridians will vote on the next state governor, Florida U.S. Senate seat, the state’s U.S. House seats and other local positions.

To register online you'll have to follow these steps:

Andrew Quintana / WLRN

Residents of tent city, the most recognizable homeless encampment in Ft. Lauderdale, stood in line outside of the Broward Public Library Monday to receive free haircuts.  

Eight local barbers set up shop on the sidewalk. They splayed the tools of their trade on folding tables as generators powered their clippers. One by one, they trimmed, cut, and shaved the heads of nearly 40 homeless individuals, always asking their clients' names and what brought them to their chair.

Timothy Greenfield-Sanders

Since David Wolkowsky died Sept. 23 at the age of 99, people on the island have been talking about his life and legacy.

Brian Demby / Courtesy

Miami’s Lemon City Trio (LCT) is bringing a fresh new meaning to the word funk.

Brian Robertson, 35, on organ; Nick Tannura, 28, on guitars and Aaron Glueckauf, 27, on drums are the musicians behind the funky jazz-soul sound that makes up Lemon City Trio. They met in Miami, decided to join forces to create a band and began rehearsing at a warehouse located in the Lemon City, a neighborhood in Miami that dates back to the mid-19th Century and overlaps now with Little Haiti.

Abandoned Animals Strain System In Puerto Rico

Sep 24, 2018

As the sun rises above San Juan’s Peninsula de Cantera neighborhood, stray pigs roam the streets looking for scraps of food.

Courtesy of Dragonfly Thirft Boutique

Shazonia Horton was released from prison a month ago and the day after her release she had a job waiting for her at the Dragonfly Thrift Boutique in Little Havana.

Alejandra Martinez

Ivan Nieves and David Torres, a couple from Puerto Rico, used to own a restaurant, hair salon and a boutique in San Juan. But one year ago, Hurricane Maria seriously damaged the business, leaving them unable to work. 

Brian Vest / Courtesy

One year ago, South Florida awoke to the destruction wrought by Hurricane Irma.

The storm had slammed into the Florida Keys as a Category 4 storm, bringing catastrophic winds and rain. According to the National Hurricane Center, the storm surge and tide produced flooding of 5 to 8 feet in the Lower Keys and winds reached 120-mph in Big Pine Key.

The storm left piles of torn down trees, couches, porta-potties, refrigerators, furniture and other debris across the islands.

Over the past year, South Florida has worked to rebuild. WLRN's Sundial producers traveled to the Keys to talk to Lynda Wells, Douglas Mader and Brian Vest, three Florida Keys residents with one mission: to help improve the lives of people in their community after the hurricane.

You can hear/read their stories below. 


Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

WLRN interns spent some time this summer looking at how the idea of gender is changing in South Florida. This story is part of their project.

Comedian Jannelys Santos has been performing improv sketches with The Villain Theater since the collective started in 2015. She describes herself as feminine and aggressive, wanting to express her sexuality onstage.

ANASTASIA SAMOYLOVA / BLOOMBERG BUSINESSWEEK

Saltwater intrusion is just one of the risks facing South Florida's drinking water. 

The Biscayne Aquifer, a 4,000-mile sponge-like rock formation that filters and stores the region's clean groundwater, is also being polluted by sewage runoff and other contaminants. 

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

The Miami-Dade County Police Department has created a new unit tasked with preventing people with serious mental illnesses from reaching a crisis point or potentially shooting someone with firearms, WLRN has learned.

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

You wouldn't know it by looking at her but, according to her mother, Sandra Lobaina was a biter. 

“I bit her," said Lobaina, smiling, when asked to explain why her mother didn't breastfeed her. "After that, she stopped. Even though I was a few days old, and I didn’t have teeth. But she was in pain, wasn’t in the correct position. And there wasn’t anyone there to come in and help her.”

Now Lobaina works as a licensed midwife and International Board Certified Lactation Consultant to make sure other mothers have the support they need to breastfeed. 

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

At 6 a.m. on a recent Thursday morning, Ernie Piton and his son dragged wooden lobster traps across their dock in Key Largo. They stabbed sharp wires through ripe, glossy fish heads, preparing for the grind of baiting and checking Florida spiny lobster traps. As the fishermen turned the key, rumbling their boat to life, they hoped for a good haul.

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