women's march

Most American women dislike the job that President Trump is doing. Many demonstrated it by marching in the streets by the tens of thousands on the first anniversary of his inauguration, and they continue to register it in public opinion polls, giving the president a starkly lower approval rating than men do.

Odalis Garcia / WLRN

More than 2,000 people -mostly women but not exclusively so- gathered on Sunday at Miami's Wynwood to mark the first anniversary of the Women's March and reiterate their commitment to "resist" President Donald Trump's administration and create a more feminist world.

Many people showed up with family, friends, and their pets. It was very much a communal affair. There were also food trucks and tents highlighting issues from reproductive rights and mass incarceration, to climate change. 

Saturday saw protesters take to the streets from New York to Los Angeles — from Nigeria to Iraq. Various incarnations of the second annual Women's March demanded social change, promoted female empowerment and declared a resistance to President Trump on the anniversary of his inauguration.

Updated at 8:40 p.m. ET

Determined to not let the momentum die, protesters once again converged on hundreds of cities — at home and abroad — for the second annual Women's March, seeking not only to unite in a call for social change but also to channel their fury into voter action.

Kate Stein / WLRN

For the second weekend in a row, protesters marched across the country against President Donald Trump's policies.

Teresa Frontado / WLRN

Women in South Florida united Saturday in a show of solidarity with the marchers in Washington D.C., around the country, and around the world.

Within an hour of opening its gates, the Bayfront Park amphitheater lawns and seats were filled with more than 10,000 demonstrators.

 

A video posted by WLRN Public Media (@wlrn) on

Jan 21, 2017 at 1:15pm PST

Updated at 9:00 a.m. ET

The Trump Administration spent its first full day in office taking shots at the media and arguing about crowd sizes at Friday's inauguration.

Press secretary Sean Spicer delivered a fiery broadside against the Fourth Estate from the White House Briefing Room Saturday evening, claiming that reporters had engaged in "deliberately false reporting" in the past 24 hours since President Trump took the oath of office. And, after berating the press, he walked away without taking any questions.