Arts & Culture

In an era when photographs are produced by the hundreds of thousands every second, the death of photographer and filmmaker Robert Frank on Monday presents an opportunity: not only to mourn him, but to honor an artist who taught many of us how to see the world around us more discretely, frame by intimate frame.

Ken Burns is our great explainer, television's finest illustrator. He's a filmmaker who gives us what we know from fresh angles, so that we can learn more and appreciate topics on a deeper level. Whether his subject is the Civil War or baseball, Burns has made an art of divining what most Americans know about a subject and then putting an arm around our collective shoulder and murmuring, "Yes, but have you seen this?"

Josh Morgerman calls himself “Hurricane Man” with good reason.

The 40-something longtime hurricane chaser just returned from Hurricane Dorian in the Bahamas, which he calls “one of the most epic hurricanes” he’s ever witnessed.

At one point during Dorian, while huddling within a designated shelter, he realized he had only two options for him and his team of fellow storm chasers: relocate or die.

When fashion designer Tan France got the call to audition for the Netflix makeover series Queer Eye, his initial reaction was to say no. France, the gay son of Pakistani Muslim immigrants, didn't want to take on the burden of representing his community — especially on television.

"The thought of being one of the very first openly gay South Asian men on a major show. ... That pressure was so hard to handle," he says. "The pressure of being one of the first to do something is massively stressful."

It's that time of year again. Fall is right around the corner. Pumpkin spice fills the air. Kids are going back to school, the days are getting shorter, and books are getting heavier. The pie-in-the-sky, read-them-in-one sitting summer-blockbuster releases now make way for complex novels filled with luscious prose, years of history, and serious issues. Books just like Maika and Maritza Moulite's Dear Haiti, Love Alaine.

In a new short story by Edwidge Danticat, a mother and daughter need to have a hard talk. So they go out to dinner — which the daughter finds ironic. "The daughter thinks, why do people wait until they're in a public place with a mouth full of food to reveal the most horrible news," Danticat says. "And a lot of us do that! You're like, let's go out to dinner, I have some news for you."

Graphic by Alejandra Martinez

We all make mistakes.

If you've never made an error in judgment or engaged in behavior that later made you cringe -- count yourself lucky. But in this digital age, an embarrassing, reckless moment can be captured on video and go "viral" in an instant.

And it’s becoming increasingly hard for parents to guide their children through a social media landscape that can so quickly turn from "Likes" and innocent chats to cyber-bullying or worse.

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

On the Aug. 26, 2019 episode of Sundial:

Hollywood Nursing Home Arrests

FILM TAMPA BAY

Numerous films and TV shows have been filmed in Florida through the years, from Burn Notice and Miami Vice to The Truman Show, The Punisher and Scarface.

The state used to entice producers with financial incentives. That program ended a few years ago, and many productions set in Florida have moved elsewhere. Some of the state's largest counties are now offering their own incentives.

E. Berken

When Merlin Oehrke walked into that diner last summer, he couldn't have guessed that his lunch would come with a side order of answered prayers.

The 89-year-old retired musician still doesn't know why he ended up in that particular diner – it wasn't one he normally went to. He sat down at the counter and spotted a teenage boy and middle-aged man nearby, going over some sheet music – his kind of music.

“A violin score. It looked like a violin concerto," he says. "I said, 'Lord, I think this is the person.'"

Armory Films / Courtesy

A new independent film called "Peanut Butter Falcon" stars Boynton Beach resident Zack Gottsagen, who plays a wrestling hero. Gottsagen has Down Syndrome, and his character, Zak, dreams of meeting his all-time-favorite wrestling figure, known as the Salt Water Redneck.

Zak, who at the beginning of the movie lives in a nursing home, escapes and accidently meets a man on the run named Tyler, a fish merchant, played by Shia Laboeuf. Tyler lost his brother in a car accident and stole fishing supplies one drunken night. Zak and Tyler join forces and go on the run together.

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