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  • Hosted by Melissa Block and Robert Siegel

In-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.

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Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

A redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report investigating Russian influence in the 2016 presidential election was released Thursday.

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Apologies to Ohio. If you've never heard of the Columbus Blue Jackets, you're definitely not alone. On the flip side, the Tampa Bay Lightning wish they'd never heard of the Blue Jackets. The Lightning were by far the best team in the National Hockey League. In fact, there was a time - like, just over a week ago - that you could say they were one of the best teams ever. No team in NHL history had ever won more games in the regular season.

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Apologies to Ohio. If you've never heard of the Columbus Blue Jackets, you're definitely not alone. On the flip side, the Tampa Bay Lightning wish they'd never heard of the Blue Jackets. The Lightning were by far the best team in the National Hockey League. In fact, there was a time - like, just over a week ago - that you could say they were one of the best teams ever. No team in NHL history had ever won more games in the regular season.

Sometimes rare diseases can let scientists pioneer bold new ideas. That has been the case with a condition that strikes fewer than 100 babies a year in the United States. These infants are born without a functioning immune system.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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South Korea has enjoyed tremendous success exporting its modern culture, especially so-called K-pop music. But that industry is now facing its biggest crisis to date - a lurid scandal involving sexual violence and official corruption. As NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports from Seoul, the problems behind the scandal are deep-rooted.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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South Korea has enjoyed tremendous success exporting its modern culture, especially so-called K-pop music. But that industry is now facing its biggest crisis to date - a lurid scandal involving sexual violence and official corruption. As NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports from Seoul, the problems behind the scandal are deep-rooted.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

South Korea has enjoyed tremendous success exporting its modern culture, especially so-called K-pop music. But that industry is now facing its biggest crisis to date - a lurid scandal involving sexual violence and official corruption. As NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports from Seoul, the problems behind the scandal are deep-rooted.

Sponsored by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Brigham Young University is known for its adherence to church teachings and for its strict Honor Code, which regulates everything from beards to premarital sex. Student protest is uncommon.

But last Friday, 300 gathered at the school's flagship campus to question its Honor Code Office, chanting, "God forgives me, why can't you?"

Students allege that the university is mistreating victims of sexual assault and harassment, especially women and LGBTQ students.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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