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In-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.

Pirette McKamey is fighting for anti-racist education.

Over her more than 30 years as an educator, the principal at Mission High School in San Francisco spent a decade leading an anti-racism committee.

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Enough is enough. That's what we're hearing from young people as they demand change not just from police departments and legislators but also from their educators. Petitions with thousands of signatures are circulating all over the country now, urging schools to incorporate what's called anti-racist education into their curricula. Here's Angela Frezza and Daniel Afolabi, former students from West Lafayette, Ind., who started a petition there.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Enough is enough. That's what we're hearing from young people as they demand change not just from police departments and legislators but also from their educators. Petitions with thousands of signatures are circulating all over the country now, urging schools to incorporate what's called anti-racist education into their curricula. Here's Angela Frezza and Daniel Afolabi, former students from West Lafayette, Ind., who started a petition there.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Enough is enough. That's what we're hearing from young people as they demand change not just from police departments and legislators but also from their educators. Petitions with thousands of signatures are circulating all over the country now, urging schools to incorporate what's called anti-racist education into their curricula. Here's Angela Frezza and Daniel Afolabi, former students from West Lafayette, Ind., who started a petition there.

In the wake of ongoing protests for racial justice, young people in America are demanding change from their schools.

Confederate Adm. Raphael Semmes, in green-patinaed bronze, sword at his hip, long stood sentry on Mobile's Government Street, the main corridor through Alabama's historic port city.

Now all that remains is the 120-year-old statue's massive granite pedestal and a commemorative plaque.

"Adm. Raphael Semmes, CSA, commander of the most successful sea raider in history, the CSS Alabama," reads David Toifel, a member of the Adm. Raphael Semmes Camp #11 of the Sons of Confederate Veterans in Mobile.

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In 1954, the Supreme Court ruled in Brown v. Board of Education that racial segregation in schools was unconstitutional. The decision is often framed as a landmark decision that transformed education for Black students, allowing them equal access to integrated classrooms.

Philando Castile, Eric Garner and George Floyd. The deaths of these Black men at the hands of police have fueled outrage over police brutality and systemic racism.

Men make up the vast majority of people shot and killed by police.

On an unusually sunny morning at Ocean Beach on the west side of San Francisco, photographer Sachi Cunningham is putting on her wetsuit, and getting her camera gear ready. A sign in the parking lot warns: "Danger: People have drowned. Enter at your own risk.'

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Today the Trump administration formally notified the United Nations that it is pulling out of the World Health Organization. For more on this move, NPR's global health correspondent Jason Beaubien joins us now.

Hey, Jason.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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It's become known as the Old Town melee. Protesters gathered last month in Albuquerque, N.M., around the bronze statue of Juan de Oñate, the controversial Spanish conquistador, in the city's historic quarter.

Videos of the event show men with guns — in military garb and tactical gear — stationed around the statue, tussling with protesters. Soon, the protesters bring out a chain and pickax to topple the figure, as police watch from afar.

This is the first in an ongoing series of stories following the struggle of one restaurant trying, like many, to reinvent itself to survive the global pandemic.

Food and drink establishments have been among the most challenging businesses to operate through the pandemic. Around the nation, many have already shut down for good, while others that reopened are now closing again because of increases in COVID-19 cases in some places.

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