feminism

ArtServe

As a child, South Florida artist Lori Pratico did not understand why people told her to be ladylike – and not to make a mess. It just didn't jive. Ultimately she found a way to embrace her true self through visual art. Now she intersects that expression as a self-taught artist with a feminist message to uplift young women. 

Lori Pratico

In a few weeks, Miami will play host to the first Democratic presidential debates of the 2020 race. Ahead of the debates on June 26th and 27th, Miami Herald political reporter David Smiley spoke with Sundial to break down what the debates will cover and what the prospects for the Democratic candidates in Florida.

Jac Martinez and Bloomsbury Publishing Inc.

T Kira Madden chronicles her childhood in Boca Raton as a queer and multiracial woman in her new debut memoir, “Long Live The Tribe of Fatherless Girls.”

Bernice Sandler, the "godmother of Title IX" who died Saturday at the age of 90, is being remembered this week for her lifelong fight to reverse decades of institutional bias in U.S. schools and open new paths for women and girls.

It all started in an elementary school in Brooklyn, N.Y., when Sandler was a determined little girl nicknamed Bunny. She was offended by the way the boys got to do all the classroom activities.

"For example, running a slide projector," says Marty Langelan, who was Sandler's friend and colleague for nearly 50 years.

One of the two women at the center of Meg Wolitzer's absorbing new novel, The Female Persuasion, is a legendary feminist named Faith Frank. Faith, who's in her 60s when the story begins, seems to be modeled on Gloria Steinem: She's charismatic, sexy and witty. We're told that Faith is not "a firebrand or a visionary; her talent was different. She could sift and distill ideas and present them in a way that made other people want to hear them."

Make no mistake. Gloria Steinem, noted feminist and author, does not see that a woman elected to the White House automatically means a win for feminists or women.

"This is not all about biology, and I think we have to be careful to always say that, because if Sarah Palin were the president it wouldn't signify change," she tells NPR's Steve Inskeep. "If President Obama did not represent the majority views of Americans and of African-Americans, he would not represent change as he does. So it isn't about simple biology. It's about what we represent."