March For Our Lives

In the battle over the Supreme Court nomination of Brett Kavanaugh, the usual suspects are lining up in support and opposition. At the grass roots, however, there is one new entry nervously eyeing the Kavanaugh nomination. It is March For Our Lives, started by high school students in Parkland, Fla., after the shooting there, and aimed ultimately at enacting more effective gun regulations.

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

After the May school shooting in Texas, President Obama's secretary of education tweeted support for a radical idea: "What if no children went to school until gun laws changed to keep them safe?"

Now, Arne Duncan is working to make his hypothetical a reality: a national public school boycott. But first, he wants input from people in Parkland.

The families of the 17 victims killed in the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting will each receive $400,000 from a $10.5 million fund. Eighteen of the injured survivors will receive $1.63 million.

Claire Thornton / WLRN News

During rush hour in downtown Ft. Lauderdale, March for Our Lives activists rallied for increased gun control  on the steps of the federal courthouse - the same place where they challenged lawmakers by "calling BS" over four months ago.

Friday's rally was part of a state-wide bus tour that includes all of Florida's 27 congressional districts. The students say their main goal is increasing the youth voter turnout rate.

A crowd of 200 filled Selby Library auditorium in Sarasota Wednesday night for a town hall featuring students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Hundreds more were unable to get a seat after the hall reached capacity.

This summer, students involved in the March For Our Lives movement are traveling across the country to energize young people. Local organizers say they want to educate and encourage them to vote.   

Student activists from a high school that suffered a mass shooting have kicked off a March for Our Lives Florida bus tour, where they plan to visit all 27 of the state's Congressional districts.

Peter Haden / WLRN

A phone call about a possible hostage situation in Parkland on Tuesday morning led police officers to swarm the home of one of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School's most outspoken student activists.

It turned out to be a prank called "swatting" — an illegal hoax call increasingly employed as a harassment tactic.

March for our lives parkland
Leslie Ovalle / WLRN

South Florida filmmaker Gina Onori has paired up with students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School to make a film about their anti-gun violence movement following February’s mass shooting. 

The film, called WE ARE THE CHANGE, follows Stoneman Douglas students before, during, and after the March For Our Lives rally in Washington D.C. two months ago. It even captures the students in legislative meetings.

Danny Hwang / WLRN News

Among the many voices in the dialogue surrounding Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s legacy in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of his assassination, Miami's youth honored his memory by joining in on a march against gun violence.

The Unity March Against Gun Violence was part of the 15th annual "Reclaim The Dream Candlelight Memorial Service" held Wednesday night at Athalie Range Park in Liberty City. 

Sunset Petit-Frere, a ninth grader at Miami Central High School, attended the march and service because she saw a connection between gun violence and Dr. King’s legacy.

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson and Tampa Congresswoman Kathy Castor spoke at a forum of high school students and school board members in Tampa Monday. He told the students to keep on demonstrating for gun control -- but be prepared if little happens.

Nicholas Kamm / AFP Getty Images

Five weeks after they cowered under desks and hid in closets as a gunman roamed the hallways of their school with an AR-15, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School students overwhelmed the streets of the nation’s capital along with hundreds of thousands of supporters from across the country.

Kyra Gurney / The Miami Herald

In the weeks leading up to the March For Our Lives in Washington, D.C., Marjory Stoneman Douglas High sophomore Ashley Baez wasn’t sure whether she wanted to go.

It wasn’t that the 15-year-old didn’t believe in fighting for stricter gun control laws.

It was that just over five weeks ago she had been shot in the leg when a gunman opened fire at her school. Now, Ashley walks with a cane. The thought of being in a crowd of strangers was terrifying.

David Smiley / The Miami Herald

Broward Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie walked out of the JW Marquis hotel on Pennsylvania Avenue Saturday morning with a crowd of Stoneman Douglas alumni, hopeful for the future and awed by the crowds flooding toward a March For Our Lives stage at the far end of the street.

Leslie Ovalle / WLRN

The first of more than 800 March For Our Lives events in Washington, D.C., the U.S. and around the world took place early on Saturday on the island of Pohnpei in the Pacific nation of Micronesia.

Here in South Florida, things kicked off, fittingly, in Parkland - which was the site of the February 14 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that killed 17 people and ignited the student-led #NeverAgain movement for stricter gun control and school safety. Marches were also held in Miami Beach, Boca Raton and Key West.

Camila Duarte recalls the chaos in her community after the shooting at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.

Pages