orlando shooting

Matthew Peddie, WMFE

Three years after the deadliest act of violence against LGBTQ people in the history of the country, at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, activists across the state are encouraged by what they say are positive steps forward for Florida’s LGBTQ community. 

In spite of significant challenges, including from conservative lawmakers who hold the majority of seats in the statehouse, a federal memorial is in the works at the site of the shooting in Orlando. And this week, Florida’s Republican Governor Ron DeSantis voiced his support for the gay community. 

Matthew Peddie / WMFE

This Wednesday marks three years since the shooting at Pulse nightclub in Orlando that killed 49 people and injured more than 50. In the aftermath of the shooting, the Orange County Regional History Center began collecting the hundreds of memorial items left at the site of the nightclub and other makeshift memorial sites around the city.

The history center’s chief curator Pam Schwartz says the work of collecting and curating those memorial items continues. She says there are now more than 10,000 items in the collection.

Miami Herald

A group pushing to ban assault weapons in Florida has hit a significant milestone in its effort to place a proposed constitutional amendment on the 2020 ballot.

Ban Assault Weapons Now!, a bipartisan organization led in part by survivors of mass shootings in Orlando and Parkland, announced Monday that it has obtained 103,000 signed petitions. The total should be enough to trigger a Florida Supreme Court review of its proposed ballot question, a mandatory step in the process.

Elected leaders are scheduled to announce Monday at Pulse plans for legislation that would designate the nightclub as a national memorial site. 

Lannis Waters / Palm Beach Post

Even though a Jupiter security company provided Pulse nightclub shooter Omar Mateen with firearms training, it can’t be blamed for his deadly 2016 rampage that left 49 people dead, a Palm Beach County judge has ruled.

Updated at 12:10 p.m. ET

The Florida state attorney's office has ended a six-month investigation into the Pulse nightclub shooting, concluding no civilians were shot by law enforcement.

The question of friendly fire has plagued law enforcement since the June 2016 shooting left 49 dead during Latin Night at the predominantly gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla. The state attorney used the FBI's ballistics report, as well as witness accounts, video evidence and 911 calls.

Brendan Byrne / WMFE

A federal judge has thrown out two lawsuit filed by more than 50 survivors and victims’ families in the Pulse nightclub shooting.

The civil lawsuit alleged the city of Orlando, police officers and an off-duty officer didn’t do enough to stop the shooter, and that the city failed to provide adequate training for its officers.

The Orlando Fire Department had been working on a plan to respond to a mass shooting. It had even purchased vests filled with tourniquets and special needles to relieve bleeding in the chest. But at the time of the Pulse nightclub shooting, the plan had already sputtered and the vests sat untouched.

Matthew Peddie / WMFE

In the wake of the shooting at Pulse, the community responded in different ways. Some gave blood, some left memorial items and others chose to honor the victims with tattoos. 

At a tattoo studio in downtown Orlando recently, survivor Yvens Carrenard got a tattoo of a woman’s face with a leopard head-dress.

“It’s always going to remind me to be strong, you know, remind to keep fighting, remind me to make my life something, because there were people that were taken away from us for no reason,” said Carrenard.

Danielle Prieur / WMFE

The bells of First United Methodist Church rang 49 times as the names of those who died at the Pulse nightclub were read aloud.

A group of Pulse survivors and victims’ families have filed a lawsuit against the night club’s owners.

Catherine Welch / WMFE

A federal judge dismissed a lawsuit filed against Facebook, Google and Twitter by families of patrons killed in the 2016 Orlando, Florida, nightclub massacre.

In his ruling, U.S. District Judge David Lawson found no legal merit for the case filed in December 2016 in Detroit by the families of Tevin Crosby, Juan Ramon Guerrero Jr., Javier Jorge-Reyes and others. They claimed gunman Omar Mateen was radicalized by propaganda found through social media.

Miami Herald

Noor Salman, the widow of the Pulse gunman, was found not guilty on all charges.

Salman was charged with providing material support to a terrorist organization and obstruction of justice. Prosecutors say she knew about her husband’s plans for the 2016 mass shooting.

More than a year and a half after Omar Mateen opened fire at an Orlando nightclub, leaving 49 victims dead and ultimately dying himself in a shootout with police, attorneys delivered their opening statements on the sole person charged in the massacre: Mateen's widow, Noor Salman.

Matthew Peddie / WMFE

Jury selection got underway Thursday in the trial of the Pulse gunman’s widow.

Noor Salman is accused of knowing about her husband’s plans for the attack that left 49 dead. She denies any involvement in the 2016 mass shooting at the gay nightclub.

Potential jurors were asked about whether news coverage including of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and recent Parkland massacre might influence their impression of the case.

Among those dismissed was a mother of a 7-week-old baby.

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