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Environment
00000173-d94c-dc06-a17f-ddddb46d0000When it comes to climate change, one thing is certain: our oceans are rising. And South Florida is expected to be among the first regions on Earth to experience the impact. In fact, some initial preparations are already underway. WLRN-Miami Herald News presents a series of stories about the effects of sea-level rise. The project is called “Elevation Zero: Rising Seas In South Florida."Click through the pages below to see our entire archive of Elevation Zero stories, or listen to these special one-hour programs aired during our week of sea-level rise coverage, Nov. 11-15, 2013:MONDAYThe Sunshine Economy: Underwater Real EstateTUESDAYAlex Chadwick's "BURN: An Energy Journal"WEDNESDAYElevation Zero town hall, hosted by WLRN's Tom HudsonTHURSDAYSelect Elevation Zero features: "Rising Seas In South Florida"FRIDAYThe Florida Roundup: Sea-Level Rise Will Flood South Florida. Now What?

Miami Beach Wants Higher Roads And Pumps To Fight Sea Rise. Some Residents Say No Way.

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Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald.com
Construction workers raise the height of the street and sidewalks in front of the Publix at 1920 West Ave. in Miami Beach.

Miami Beach won't be elevating new roads anytime soon, after fierce opposition from residents who alternatively insisted their neighborhood didn't flood and therefore didn't need higher streets, or who worried higher streets would send floodwater into their homes.

Neighbors in the city's latest stop on its internationally lauded $500 million plan to pump, pipe and elevate itself away from rising seas fought back from what they say is an unnecessary project — one they say will ruin their property values.

"We will not let Upper North Bay Road become another failed experiment," said Jane Jacobs, a resident of the tiny bayside patch of island the city had planned to spend $24 million on upgrading pipes for drinking, sewage and stormwater, as well as elevating the road.

Read more from our news partner, The Miami Herald.