© 2022 WLRN
MIAMI | SOUTH FLORIDA
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
News
Brazilian investors buy Miami real estate. Haitian earthquake survivors attend South Florida schools. It's clear what happens in Latin America and the Caribbean has a profound effect on South Florida.WLRN’s coverage of the region is headed by Americas editor Tim Padgett, a 23-year veteran of TIME and Newsweek magazines.He joins a team of reporters and editors at the Miami Herald, El Nuevo Herald and NPR to cover a region whose cultural wealth, environmental complexity, vast agricultural output and massive oil reserves offer no shortage of important and fascinating stories to tell.

Cuba's Fledgling Entrepreneurs Visit Miami For Capitalist Consultation

6a00d83451b26169e201a3fd435d85970b-800wi.jpg
Miami Herald

A fledgling private sector is taking root in communist Cuba. Last week a group of Cuban entrepreneurs made an unprecedented visit to Miami to learn how to run a business -- and to convince Americans they’re the real deal.

To salvage his ragged economy, Cuban leader Raúl Castro has decreed limited free-market reforms. Half a million Cubans have either started up small enterprises, ranging from pizzerias to furniture makers, or are employed by them. Five of those new capitalists met with South Florida business owners and start-up consultants. Among them was Sandra Aldama, who owns a Havana company called D’Brujas, which makes some of the first hypo-allergenic soaps to be sold in Cuba.

"Finding the most basic capital goods and suppliers [in Cuba] is incredibly difficult," says Aldama. "But we're achieving something that's a dream for many people in Cuba."

The entrepreneurs came at the invitation of The Cuba Study Group, a Washington-based organization that encourages increased engagement with Cuba. Those who oppose that increased contact say investment in even private Cuban businesses will only aid the Castro dictatorship.