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Israel strikes U.N-run school in Gaza; a Georgia clinic cares for the uninsured

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Today's top stories

Israeli troops have launched a new ground and air offensive in central Gaza, where many Palestinians have fled in recent weeks from Rafah in the south. A predawn strike hit a U.N.-run school that had been sheltering displaced families. At least 140 Palestinians have been killed in the past two days, a hospital director tells NPR.

Palestinians look at the aftermath of the Israeli strike on a U.N.-run school that killed dozens of people in the Nusseirat refugee camp in the Gaza Strip, Thursday, June 6, 2024. (AP Photo/Abdel Kareem Hana)
Abdel Kareem Hana/AP / AP
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AP
Palestinians look at the aftermath of the Israeli strike on a U.N.-run school that killed dozens of people in the Nusseirat refugee camp in the Gaza Strip, Thursday, June 6, 2024. (AP Photo/Abdel Kareem Hana)

  • 🎧 Israel says its ground troops are operating in a limited manner, and its air force is targeting Hamas, NPR's Kat Lonsdorf reports on Up First. But NPR’s producer on the ground, Anas Baba, says the area has been pummeled. Karin Huster of Doctors Without Borders tells NPR that "the situation is apocalyptic."


A spat between neighbors has landed Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito in headlines after an upside-down flag was flown at his house in 2021. Former President Donald Trump's supporters have used the flipped flag as a symbol of protest. Last month, Alito declined to recuse himself from two Jan. 6-related cases and reiterated that his wife flew the flag.

  • 🎧 NPR's Tom Dreisbach spoke with Emily Baden, the neighbor at the center of the dispute. She put anti-Trump signs in front of her house after the 2020 election and Martha-Ann Alito then displayed the upside-down flag in response. Baden says: "The power imbalance between these people and myself is huge. And they're choosing to harass and intimidate us."


More than 10 million people are under excessive heat warnings in Arizona, Nevada and parts of California through the end of the week, with temperatures of up to 112 degrees predicted in Las Vegas. Climate scientists warn that this could be one of the hottest summers on record in many parts of the U.S. It's not only dangerous to your health — it could hurt your wallet, too. The National Energy Assistance Directors Association predicts the average family will pay $719 in electric bills from June through September — a 7.9% jump from a year ago.

Life advice

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Getty Images

Atlantic hurricane season began this month and runs through November 30. Forecasters predict it will be one of the most active on record. Florida-based emergency manager Chauncia Willis recommends forming a disaster preparedness plan sooner rather than later. "Don't wait until the skies are gray. Think about what to do to survive right now."

  • 🎒Prepare an evacuation plan. Assess your vulnerabilities, give yourself plenty of time to leave and map out a route in advance.
  • 🎒 Have a go bag with items like nonperishable food and water, cash, spare batteries, medications and hygiene items.
  • 🎒 Use a checklist to make sure you don't forget anything in the stress of the moment. The American Red Cross has a comprehensive one.
  • 🎒 If you're working on a smaller budget, prepare what you can now and tap into community resources to help.
  • 🎒 Take the threat seriously. Storms are forming more frequently. They're larger, more powerful and cause more damage.

We, the voters

 Greg Lang
Claire Harbage / NPR
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NPR
Greg Lang

As part of the We, The Voters series, NPR is bringing you stories about how politics impacts the nation's health care system. 

A record number of Americans are now insured under the Affordable Care Act. But millions are still living without coverage. The Good Samaritan clinic in Gwinnett County, Georgia is dedicated to caring for the uninsured. It offers non-emergency care for children and adults at about 60% of the cost to render those services. Fundraising makes up the difference. For many patients at Good Samaritan, it may be the first time they've ever seen a doctor. Chief Financial Officer Greg Lang says he wants to see the U.S. move away from insurance-based health care.

🎧 Listen to why Lang thinks health care should be a private transaction between provider and patient, and hear from a Good Samaritan nurse about the personal impact she makes at the clinic.

3 things to know before you go

Kelly Green, a tattoo Artist from Bolton, smells the one of the corpse flowers at ESCU on June 5. Green put seeing one on her bucket list after she found out about the corpse flower. She has been asking clients and people in her life to tell her where to find one for years.
Dave Wurtzel / Connecticut Public
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Connecticut Public
Kelly Green, a tattoo Artist from Bolton, smells the one of the corpse flowers at ESCU on June 5. Green put seeing one on her bucket list after she found out about the corpse flower. She has been asking clients and people in her life to tell her where to find one for years.

  1. A rare double-stemmed "corpse flower" is stinking up Eastern Connecticut State University. The plant reaches its first bloom after about 10 years, at which point it smells like a mix of rotting fish and feces. (via Connecticut Public)
  2. More than 150 people have fallen ill after being exposed to cucumbers that were possibly contaminated with salmonella, according to the CDC.
  3. Brain injuries in American football are a well-known risk. But researchers have found that horse sports are also a leading cause. Event rider Jonathan Holling breaks down the concerns and measures being taken to make the sport safer.

This newsletter was edited by Olivia Hampton.

Copyright 2024 NPR

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