Rachel Iacovone

Rachel Iacovone is a reporter and associate producer of Gulf Coast Live for WGCU News. Rachel came to WGCU as an intern in 2016, during the presidential race. She went on to cover Florida Gulf Coast University students at President Donald Trump's inauguration on Capitol Hill and Southwest Floridians in attendance at the following day's Women's March on Washington.

Rachel was first contacted by WGCU when she was managing editor of FGCU's student-run media group, Eagle News. She helped take Eagle News from a weekly newspaper to a daily online publication with TV and radio branches within two years, winning the 2016 Society of Professional Journalists Mark of Excellence Award for Best Use of Multimedia in a cross-platform series she led for National Coming Out Day. She also won the Mark of Excellence Award for Feature Writing for her five-month coverage of an FGCU student's transition from male to female.

As a WGCU reporter, she produced the first radio story in WGCU's Curious Gulf Coast project, which answered the question: Does SWFL Have More Cases of Pediatric Cancer?

Rachel graduated from Florida Gulf Coast University with a bachelor's degree in journalism.


Marine life has all been wiped out in the waters surrounding Gasparilla Island. 

The inlet straddles Charlotte and Lee counties, but the residential part — including Boca Grande — falls entirely under Lee, which has hauled more than 2.8 million pounds of dead fish from its beaches and waterways in the first two weeks of August alone.


A fatal shooting in Clearwater last month revived the debate over Florida's "Stand Your Ground" law after Pinellas County Sheriff Bob Gualtieri cited the law as his reason for not charging the shooter, 48-year-old Michael Drejka.

Drejka, who is white, shot an unarmed black man, 28-year-old Markeis McGlockton, in a confrontation over a disabled parking spot.

Florida's U.S. Senators — Democrat Bill Nelson and Republican Marco Rubio — introduced legislation Thursday to extend the stay of some Canadian citizens who vacation in the U.S. 

Days away from the official start of the Atlantic hurricane season and days after subtropical storm Alberto made landfall in Florida, Everglades City was still trying to piece itself back together, more than eight months after Hurricane Irma.

The Trump Administration announced its decision Monday night to end Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for the nearly 50 thousand Haitian nationals who have been living in the U.S. since the 2010 earthquake that killed more than 200 thousand people.