Ryan Dailey

Ryan Dailey is a reporter/producer for WFSU/Florida Public Radio. After graduating from Florida State University, Ryan went into print journalism working for the Tallahassee Democrat for five years. At the Democrat, he worked as a copy editor, general assignment and K-12 education reporter.

Born in Nashua, New Hampshire, Ryan also lived in Lawrenceville, Georgia and Southwest Florida before moving to Tallahassee. On a day off, you might find him playing guitar, attempting to play golf or hanging out with his dog, Buddy.

A group of Democratic state senators are among those calling for an apology from Governor Ron DeSantis, after he said farmworkers’ lifestyle is facilitating COVID-19 spread.

One added permission for Florida restaurants brought on by COVID-19’s disruption might be sticking around: Alcohol delivery.

In his March 20 executive order closing restaurants’ dining rooms, Governor Ron DeSantis permitted delivery of adult beverages. He says it’s something he's interested in making permanent, even as the state enters its phased reopening of the economy:

"I allowed them to deliver alcohol, I think that’s been pretty popular – I think we’re going to keep that going," DeSantis said Tuesday. "Maybe we’ll have the legislature change the law on that."

News Service of Florida

The Florida Legislature has two more weeks to move on the creation of a statewide resiliency task force. The group of appointees would provide the state’s official estimates of sea level rise, if it gets the chance.

 

 

“Governor DeSantis took an unprecedented step here in Florida to appoint Florida’s first chief resiliency officer, Dr. Julia Nesheiwat,” said Republican Senator Tom Lee, who chairs the Infrastructure and Security committee.

Sponsors of a bill that puts a moment of silence at the top of each day in Florida’s public schools say it’s about mitigating stress in a hectic world. The bill is cruising through both chambers, but some are warning that it’s rooted in Judeo-Christian values.  

Florida Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried is the only statewide elected Democrat, and, she claims Republicans have it out for her. Fried is battling proposals that cut her department’s budget and take away the Office of Energy — something she’s calling a power grab. Republican lawmakers, meanwhile, are brushing off her complaints.

The Florida Senate has passed a controversial bill mandating minors get consent from a parent before getting an abortion. The probability it will land on Governor Ron DeSantis’ desk is high.

Florida is among the states looking to force the issue of athlete pay on the NCAA. California passed a law to do so last year. Three House committees held a joint meeting on the subject Monday.

A day before the 2020 legislative session kicks off, three House committees will meet to discuss the idea of allowing collegiate athletes to get paid for their name and likeness.

Senate President Bill Galvano had breakfast with members of the Capitol press corps Tuesday, fielding questions on (just about) everything under the Sunshine. Here are a few of the matters Galvano weighed in on:

Under a bill moving through the Florida Senate, leaving a dog chained up outside during a natural disaster, like a hurricane, tropical storm or tornado warning, would be a first degree misdemeanor. It would be punishable by up to one year in jail or a fine of $5,000. The rule would also apply during a mandatory evacuation order.

The Florida Cabinet has appointed a new commissioner for the state’s Office of Financial Regulation. One cabinet member, Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried, withheld her vote.

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis is calling the 2020 legislative session the ‘Year of the Teacher,’ and recently rolled out his budget asks for K-12 education.

A proposed interstate agreement that would create a true popular vote election is moving across the nation. This week, one of the plan’s original authors talked with state lawmakers during a lunch and learn event. WFSU spoke with Vik Amar about the idea he and his brother hatched nearly two decades ago.

Citing what they say is a tremendous public and private cost to Floridians from divorce, two Republican state legislators want to create a “Florida Guide to Healthy Marriages.” They’ve filed a bill to do so for the coming legislative session.

Five years after an amendment was added to Florida’s constitution to squirrel away money for buying conservation lands – the groups that pushed it are uniting behind a new common goal.

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