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Coral reefs in the warming Atlantic, Disney settles Florida lawsuit and weekly briefing

Volunteer divers and Rosenstiel School scientists collect healthy coral from the Paradise Reef nursery be planted on an adjacent reef on Friday, August 4, 2023.
D.A. Varela
/
The Miami Herald
Volunteer divers and Rosenstiel School scientists collect healthy coral from the Paradise Reef nursery be planted on an adjacent reef on Friday, August 4, 2023.

Coral reefs in the warming Atlantic 

Temperatures in the Atlantic Ocean are about as high as they would be in June and scientists are worried. It’s an ominous sign for hurricane season and for Florida’s coral reefs, which are still recovering from last year’s marine heatwave.

For more on the warming waters and the fight to save the corals, we invite a pair of researchers with the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine, Atmosphericand Earth Science.

Guests:

  • Brian McNoldy, senior research associate of atmospheric sciences at UM’s Rosenstiel School. 
  • Dalton Hesley, senior research associate in the Coral Reef Restoration Lab at UM’s Rosenstiel School. 
  • Jenny Staletovich, environmental editor for WLRN News. 

Disney settles Florida lawsuit 

The Central Florida Tourism Oversight District (CFTOD), the governing board appointed by Gov. Ron DeSantis, this week settled lawsuits over who has control over design and construction at Disney World.

We talk about the new deal and the history of the feud between the governor and theme park company with Orlando Sentinel reporter Skyler Swisher.

Guest:

  • Skyler Swisher, investigative reporter for the Orlando Sentinel.

Weekly briefing 

The collapse of the Francis Scott Key Bridge in Baltimore this week was an instant reminder for many in the Tampa Bay region of the 1980 Sunshine Skyway bridge disaster. WUSF’s Meghan Bowman spoke with Eckerd Search and Rescue about the similarities.

Mangroves tamp down waves and keep shorelines from eroding. And as storms become more intense and sea levels rise, their value will only become greater. But they are being chopped down faster than they can be replaced. WUSF’s Steve Newborn tells us about a first-of-its-kind effort to determine how many mangroves still exist and how they can be saved.

The situation in Haiti continues to deteriorate in the wake of continued political unrest and gang violence. Tampa-based photographer Octavio Jones recently returned from reporting in Haiti last week and spoke with WUSF’s Sky Lebron about his experience.

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