Homeless Encampment In Palm Beach, Civil Rights History Book & Bike Safety Panel

Feb 13, 2020

On this Thursday, Feb. 13, episode of Sundial:

Palm Beach County Homeless Encampment 

Dozens of tents housing homeless people are clustered in "Tent City," a football field-size area in John Prince Memorial Park in Lake Worth. 

Palm Beach County officials visited the encapment on Thursday to speak with the homeless. Residents near the area have raised sanitary and safety concerns. 

“The rise of the Tent City over the past five months, near an area in the park recently considered for a Major League Baseball spring training complex, represents the biggest test of patience and tolerance yet for park-goers and nearby homeowners,” reports the Palm Beach Post. 

County Mayor Dave Kerner joins Sundial to talk about the county's plan to remove the homeless in a respectable way.

A Civil Rights History Book

Eight classmates from Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania wrote the book, “Sevens Sisters and a Brother,” recounting a civil rights protest nearly 50 years ago that led to significant changes in improving black curriculum and treatment at the college.

“We were shocked that race was a factor at sorting out who would be my roommate,” says Miami resident Marylin Holifield, one of the book’s authors. “That difference in treatment was a message to me that the college was more concerned about the white students' concerns with race.” 

Holifield joins Sundial to talk about how the protest was fundamental to the civil rights battle on campuses throughout the country. 

Are South Florida streets safe for people not in cars?

Activists in Miami took action this week, calling for protected bike lanes on the Venetian Causeway. Last August, Chef Flavia Carnicelli was killed on her morning commute to her job at a Brazilian restaurant while biking on the causeway. 

This week, Transit Alliance, a nonprofit organization pushing for better public transportation solutions in Miami-Dade County, launched a Safer Venetian Causeway campaign demanding the city of Miami for safer biking infrastructure. 

“We could have entire groups of people who could commute [in Miami] and it can be done but we got to be aggressive,” says Wynwood Commander and biking advocate Dan Kerr. 

Sundial gathered a group of panelists to talk about how to make streets safer for bicyclists. Guests: Eli Stiers, a Miami-based personal injury lawyer focused on cyclist cases; Andrea Iglesias with Urban Health Partnerships; and Roger McVeigh, a Key West cyclist who worked on the city’s cycling plan.