Traffic + Noise Disturbance = Ultra

Mar 18, 2016

Ultra Music Festival kicked off Friday, but not everyone is “Ultra-excited”.

Since 2001 , Ultra has been taking over downtown Miami. It's gotten bigger each year, and the city and its residents have felt its growth.

“I understand that Ultra brings a lot of money, but it does bring a lot of inconveniences,” said Nadia Sloley, who works at the  Vizcayne Condo Building, 253 NE Second St., a short distance from the festival site.

This year Miami police will be rerouting traffic throughout the weekend.

The southbound lanes of Biscayne Boulevard will be used for northbound traffic from Southeast First Street to Northeast Fourth Street, where all northbound traffic will be redirected to regular lanes.

Aside from traffic woes,  residents also suffer living with a noisy neighbor for the weekend.

“For three days,  you cannot actually live here. If you live here while they are playing music, the entire floor of your apartment trembles up and down,” said Mercello Cali, a resident of Vizcayne Condo Building.

You can read more about the affects of the noise levels at the festival here.

According to the Miami Herald, 50,000 people are expected to attend each day.

Festival-goers wait to cross Biscayne Boulevard to enter Ultra.
Credit John Power / WLRN