children

PEDRO PORTAL / MIAMI HERALD

Slain UPS driver Frank Ordonez and children killed by gun violence were remembered at a candlelight vigil Wednesday in Liberty City.

About 200 people honored lives lost at Florida Parents of Murdered Children’s emotional fourth annual vigil at Mt. Calvary Missionary Baptist Church. The group, led by activist Tangela Sears, lobbies for local, state and federal legislation and advocates for services to help individuals and families impacted by gun violence.

Federal workers are on the cusp of getting 12 weeks of paid parental leave, thanks to a landmark proposal making its way through Congress.

The House on Wednesday passed the measure, which is slated for a Senate vote next week and is expected to become law.

"The idea that you could be at home for 12 weeks would be a real game changer, I think, for people — myself included," says Becky Williams, who works as an analyst at the U.S. State Department.

Caroll Spinney, the actor and puppeteer who portrayed Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch on Sesame Street over five decades, died Sunday at age 85.

The Sesame Workshop said Spinney had died at home in Connecticut, and that he had long lived with dystonia, a disorder that causes involuntary muscle contractions.

Sexual violence against children happens everywhere: in wealthy enclaves, in slums, in suburbs, in rural villages.

Invariably, it happens in secret: in the privacy of family homes, in dark corners of schools and churches, and in murky shadows at neighborhood, community, sporting and scouting events.

A majority of parents rarely, if ever, discuss race/ethnicity, gender, class or other categories of social identity with their kids, according to a new, nationally representative survey of more than 6,000 parents conducted by Sesame Workshop and NORC at the University of Chicago.

MIAMI HERALD

A lawsuit filed Thursday seeks to end the practice of keeping Florida juveniles in solitary confinement, which the plaintiffs called “inconsistent with evolving standards of decency in a civilized society.”

The Southern Poverty Law Center, Florida Legal Services and Florida Justice Institute filed the federal lawsuit against the the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice and its secretary, Simone Marstiller.

Mike Stocker / South Florida Sun Sentinel

For some children, learning how to focus on following a command, helping a peer, or showing good sportsmanship can be a challenge. Now one nationally recognized researcher is out to prove how those basic lessons in changing behaviors can be a more effective treatment than medicine for ADHD.

Girl Scouts of the USA wants to take Boy Scouts of America to court. The organization has filed a federal lawsuit accusing the Boy Scouts of trademark infringement.

This started last October, when the Boy Scouts said it would start allowing girls to join its programs.

Fully half the world's students aged 13 to 15, or 150 million teens, reported that they'd been bullied in the past month or been in a physical fight in the past year, according to a new report from UNICEF. In addition, half of all children live in countries that allow some forms of corporal punishment in school, putting 720 million kids at risk of violence from their teachers.

Fifteen years ago, psychologists Barbara Rogoff and Maricela Correa-Chavez ran a simple experiment. They wanted to see how well kids pay attention — even if they don't have to.

They would bring two kids, between the ages 5 to 11, into a room and have them sit at two tables.

Then they had a research assistant teach one of the kids how to assemble a toy.

The other kid was told to wait. Rogoff says they would tell the second child, "You can sit over here, and in a few minutes you'll have a turn to make this origami jumping mouse," — a different task altogether.

On New Year's Eve, back in 2012, Savannah Eason retreated into her bedroom and picked up a pair of scissors.

"I was holding them up to my palm as if to cut myself," she says. "Clearly what was happening was I needed someone to do something."

Her dad managed to wrestle the scissors from her hands, but that night it had become clear she needed help.

"It was really scary," she recalls. "I was sobbing the whole time."

Savannah was in high school at the time. She says the pressure she felt to succeed — to aim high — had left her anxious and depressed.

Kathleen Dubos

When Cardal Dobard received his “Summer Fun Pack” Friday, he smiled bright. Inside, he found a jump rope, frisbee, chalk, sunscreen and instructions for a number of outdoor games.

“I like my jump rope the most because it helps you exercise while having fun,” says Dobard, an elementary school-aged kid who lives in Fort Lauderdale.

What Kind Of Parent Are You: Carpenter Or Gardener?

May 28, 2018

There are two kinds of parents in modern America, says Alison Gopnik in her recent book, The Gardener and the Carpenter.

The "carpenter" thinks that his or her child can be molded. "The idea is that if you just do the right things, get the right skills, read the right books, you're going to be able to shape your child into a particular kind of adult," she says.

Jack & Jill Children's Center
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

Two-year-old Ari Williams is testing out the new motor-sensory friendly playground at the Jack & Jill Children’s Center on West Broward Boulevard.

“It’s sand!” she yells, and scoops tiny cups of sand into smaller containers.

She then jumps to the water tables where she throws her hands in and can splash around. 

"There was a girl in my class who had on dirty clothes. The other kids laughed at her but I played with her during recess."

That's an everyday act of kindness toward a child who is being ostracized. It was reported by an elementary school student who took part in a new, nationally-representative survey of children ages 9 to 11. The purpose was to capture not only the bad, but also the good of how children treat each other, and even a little bit of the why.

Here are some of the key findings:

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