Cuban music

CM Guerrero / Miami Herald

Celia Cruz's music is timeless. 

In her iconic La Vida Es Un Carnaval, she sings  – "You don't have to cry … life is a carnival … it's more beautiful to live singing." When it plays in Miami nightclubs, people hit the dance floor.

Sometimes destiny seems to drop a little hint of goodness you could never imagine coming your way. For Cuban-born Aymée Nuviola and Puerto Rican-born Jeimy Osorio destiny played out to the tune of Celia Cruz.

Aymée Nuviola was a young singer with Pachito Alonso's orchestra when she met the legendary "Queen of Salsa" at a wedding in Mexico. It was a brief encounter that sparked an affinity between the two Afro-Cuban singers who were far from their homeland. Cruz offered up a little career advice and as she was leaving, took off her big, stone earrings and gave them to Nuviola.

Credit Niall Macaulay / cheer.productions@mac.com

The Grammy-winning Cuban band Los Van Van celebrated their 50th anniversary last month at Miami’s Studio 60 club with a sold-out show. One of the island’s most popular post-revolutionary salsa ensembles kept the crowd dancing into the early hours under sparkling disco balls.

But now fans in Miami are wondering whether they’ll ever be able to see the band play again.

Outumuro

Guests for Sundial on Thursday, March 8 2018:

WLRN's education reporter  Jessica Bakeman joined us via Skype to give us the latest from Tallahassee, where the legislative session was extended into next week because both chambers were unable to reach a budget agreement. Bakeman also discussed the controversial gun reform bill that was passed through the House and awaits Gov. Scott's approval.

Courtesy of the artist

Miami jazz saxophonist David Leon is one of the 2017 recipients of the ASCAP Foundation’s Herb Alpert Young Jazz Composer Award for his work. As part of that award, he will be playing at this year's Newport Jazz Festival.

Courtesy of Simone Dinnerstein

An orchestra from Cuba is making its South Florida debut amidst changing relations between it and the U.S.

The Havana Lyceum Orchestra is on its first tour throughout the U.S. and will be performing Friday at the New World Center in Miami Beach.

The orchestra is one of the country’s most prominent classical music groups composed of conservatory students, graduates and music teachers.

With about half of the members of the orchestra, violinist Maiin Hau has been touring the east coast: New York, Philadelphia, Boston, now Miami Beach.

Here's a taste of Cuban music in the time of Castro

Nov 28, 2016

Cuba has had a rich musical history, both before and during Fidel Castro's revolution and presidency.

Today, when most people think of Cuban music, they're quick to mention Buena Vista Social Club, and there's good reason. But there's so much more to Cuban music than that all-star group. Here are a few more pivotal artists to check out.

1. 1960s - LOS ZAFIROS: “Cuando yo la conocí”

Afro-Cuban Funk Band PALO! Performs Live!

May 16, 2014
WLRN

05/16/14 - Next time on South Florida Arts Beat experience the Latin Funk of PALO! They’ll perform compositions from their new CD: PALO! Live in our WLRN TV Studio A. For the past ten years this signature Miami band has been spreading their brand of 'Afro-Cuban Funk' featuring the Grammy-nominated vocalist Leslie Cartaya. This is Cuban music for a new generation. Catch the excitement of PALO!

Alicia Zuckerman / WLRN

After almost two decades a famed South Florida live music venue is no more.

Located on the corner of Jefferson Avenue and Lincoln Road on Miami Beach, in the historic Van Dyke building built in 1924, Van Dyke Cafe had its last call on Sunday, Jan. 26. Patrons were invited for a special celebration and toast at 5 p.m. to commemorate the closing. The venue was well known for hosting live jazz and became a staple of the beach's people-watching haven, Lincoln Road Mall.

arturosandoval.com

This week, President Obama bestowed the nation's highest civilian honor on 16 celebrated Americans, one of them a Cuban-American widely considered one of the world's greatest living jazz artists.

The cover of Arturo Sandoval's 1991 album "Flight to Freedom" features a photo of the musician wearing a smart suit and a radiant smile, his right hand gripping his trumpet, his left curled into a triumphant fist.  Just one year before the release of that album,  Sandoval was living in Cuba under the Castro regime.