Democratic National Committee

The massive Democratic presidential field could begin its inevitable reduction this week with only half of the current candidates set to make the cut for next month's debate.

The controversial decision will please many party stalwarts who worry that the often dizzying number of Democrats seeking the nomination could endanger their chances of defeating President Trump.

The Democratic presidential candidates take the stage for the second round of debates Tuesday and Wednesday in Detroit. A lot is on the line for the candidates, who have been engaged in back-and-forths over race and health care coming into this round of debates.

On Tuesday, progressives Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren face off for the first time in this campaign. And several other candidates will be scrambling for a breakout night to get back on voters' minds.

The growing popularity of FaceApp — a photo filter app that delights smartphone users with its ability to transform the features of any face, like tacking on years of wrinkles — has prompted Democratic Sen. Chuck Schumer to call for a federal investigation into the Russia-based company over what he says are potential national security and privacy risks to millions of Americans.

The 20-person lineup for the two-night Democratic presidential debate on July 30 and 31 will look familiar, with just one change from last month's event.

Last week, California Rep. Eric Swalwell became the first major candidate to end his White House bid. Montana Gov. Steve Bullock — after only narrowly missing the mark last time — will take his place.

Joe Biden
Alexia Fodere/Miami Herald / WLRN

We now know which Democratic presidential candidates will face off during the upcoming debates in Miami. NBC announced the matchups Friday, which were decided by drawing names in New York City.

Pedro Portal / El Nuevo Herald

Donna Brazile, former chair of the Democratic National Committee, appeared at the Miami Book Fair last week to promote her newly published account of the 2016 presidential election.

Brazile took over for South Florida Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz as DNC chair in July of that year. In the book, “Hacks: The Inside Story of the Break-ins and Breakdowns That Put Donald Trump in the White House,” Brazile writes about a Democratic Party in deep debt and under the financial control of Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign.

Wilfredo Lee/AP

It’s been weeks since Debbie Wasserman Schultz resigned as chair of the Democratic National Committee (DNC), but the fallout from the WikiLeaks email release continues to threaten her congressional campaign.

 

The candidate challenging Wasserman- Schultz for her congressional seat filed a Federal Election Commission (FEC) complaint on Monday for what he says is a misuse of DNC resources.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation says it is looking into the hacking of the Democratic National Committee computer system, after the website WikiLeaks published thousands of internal emails on the eve of the party's convention.

How WikiLeaks obtained the emails is unclear.

Why would Russian President Vladimir Putin want to help Donald Trump win the White House?

That's the accusation from Democrats this week, after embarrassing internal Democratic National Committee emails appeared on Wikileaks on the eve of the party's convention in Philadelphia.

The emails were lifted earlier this year in a hacking breach that security experts have linked to Russian espionage groups.

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz had an abysmal weekend, and Monday morning started out no better for her.

Her fellow Floridians loudly booed her when she spoke at her home state's delegate breakfast Monday morning. And later the Democratic National Committee chairwoman confirmed she wouldn't even gavel in the start of the convention this afternoon in Philadelphia.

Amid furor over an email leak that revealed a bias against Bernie Sanders inside the Democratic National Committee, U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz announced Sunday she will step down as chair.

Wasserman Schultz will still open and close the convention, she said in a statement, and "address our delegates about the stakes involved in this election not only for Democrats, but for all Americans."

With just one weekend to go before Hillary Clinton is expected to accept her party's nomination for president, WikiLeaks on Friday released almost 20,000 emails sent and received by Democratic National Committee staff members from January 2015 to May 2016 – leaving journalists scouring for information potentially damaging to the party.