hurricane preparedness

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

For people who don't have consistent access to food, the effects of Hurricane Dorian could linger for weeks.

Floridians who were scheduled to receive federal SNAP benefits, or food stamps, between Sept. 1 and 14 were allowed to get that help early, on Aug. 31, so they could prepare for the storm. But advocates worry they could run out of food by mid-September.

tr0tt3r / Creative Commons

Floridians concerned about running out of medication during or after the storm will get relief in knowing some insurers are allowing members in all counties to get an early refill of their medications.

Florida Blue said its members can get a 30-day emergency supply of medication from in-network pharmacies through Sept. 28. In addition, should their doctors offices close, members can members can use the Florida Blue website or mobile app, or call Florida Blue, to find care at an alternative participating provider.

What To Put In A Hurricane Emergency Supply Kit

Aug 30, 2019

With Hurricane Dorian approaching Florida, the Florida Department of Health has put together a checklist for hurricane supply kites.

FPREN / COURTESY

Forecasters say it's still too early to know with certainty where will hurricane Dorian land in Florida — but it's never too late to assemble your hurricane emergency kit.

Here's what you need:

anankkml / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Hurricane season officially kicks off June 1, which means it's time to review emergency plans. And for South Florida residents with medical needs, that can involve extra work to ensure a spot on county lists for emergency evacuation assistance.

Florida counties maintain special needs registries for emergency situations. During hurricanes, people who have pre-registered on these lists are eligible for priority evacuation help and medical shelters—depending on their level of need.

Debbie Wasserman Schultz
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

Weather officials have been able to reduce forecasting errors for a hurricane's track, including its "cone of uncertainty," in the last 20 years. But more research is needed to better predict how intense a storm will be.

That's according to National Hurricane Center Director Ken Graham, who spoke on a panel Thursday at the Broward County Emergency Operations Center in Plantation. 

MARK WILSON / GETTY IMAGES

The Atlantic Hurricane season starts June 1. That means people have likely begun begging you to get your hurricane emergency plan in order and not wait until the last minute to stock up on water, canned food and other supplies (including us).

But a lot of people in South Florida can’t afford to do that.

Mayor Mc Ginn / Courtesy

A little nudging for storm prep shouldn’t be necessary after Matthew battered Florida’s east coast in 2016, Irma essentially drenched the entire state in 2017, and Michael ground up a chunk of the Panhandle last year.

AL DIAZ / MIAMI HERALD

Money is one of the biggest determinants when it comes to deciding whether to evacuate during a hurricane.

The results of a 1,000-person questionnaire conducted by the National Hurricane Survival Initiative found one in five Floridians won’t evacuate during a hurricane. It also suggests Floridians aren’t as prepared as they should be for the storms.

AL DIAZ / Miami Herald

Florida’s Public Service Commission (FPSC) has new recommendations to improve electrical systems after a hurricane. 

In their new report, “Review of Florida’s Electric Utility Hurricane Preparedness and Restoration Actions 2018,” the FPSC used data collected from past hurricane reviews and identified tree trimming, underground power lines and utility workers as critical areas to hurricane preparedness.

Kate Stein / WLRN

The newspaper headline for August 28, 2019, reads: “Category 5 Hurricane Expected to Hit Homestead, South Miami in Three Days.”

Kate Stein / WLRN

"Seventy-two hours. Three days."

That's how long officials expect residents to be able to survive on their own after a hurricane strikes, which includes having on hand three days' worth of food, medicines and other necessities, according to Mark Moore, deputy emergency manager for the City of Miami.

Tax ‘Holiday’ To Trim Cost Of Stocking Up For Storms

May 29, 2018

With a sales-tax “holiday” starting next week, retailers are expecting big spending on disaster-preparedness supplies by Floridians who have fresh memories of Hurricane Irma.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Several South Florida nonprofits are launching five meetings to ensure equality in hurricane recovery efforts, continuing work that began after Hurricane Irma.

The Florida House is rolling out dozens of recommendations on the state’s hurricane response efforts. Equipping emergency shelters and preparing healthcare facilities top the list.

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