mass shooting

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio says he would support raising the age limit to 21 for those wanting to purchase AR-15-style rifles.

"If you are 18 years of age, you should not be able to buy a rifle," Rubio said at a CNN town hall meeting Wednesday night. "I will support a law that takes that right away."

Rubio, who has an A+ rating from the National Rifle Association, said he does not support arming teachers, but does support background check regulation reform.

Courtesy

Little more than a week ago, some of the biggest problems students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School faced were math tests and the baseball team’s performance.

But seven days after a 19-year-old gunman went on a killing spree at the Parkland school, students turned into activists as they cried, pleaded and argued with lawmakers Wednesday in the state Capitol.

TNS (via Miami Herald)

Several Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School students and parents met with President Donald Trump Wednesday afternoon, one week after 17 students and staff were killed in a mass shooting at the Parkland school.

“I don’t know how I’m ever going to step foot in that place again,” Douglas student Sam Zeif said. “Or go to a public park after school or walk anywhere. Me and my friends, we get scared when a car drives by. We need to let ideas flow and get the problem solved. I don’t understand. I turned 18 the day after. I woke up to the news that my best friend was gone.

Gina Jordan / WLRN News

A week after a mass shooting at a Broward County high school, survivors and gun-control advocates demanded Wednesday that state lawmakers enact tighter gun and school-safety laws as a rally drew one of the largest crowds at the Capitol since the 2000 election recount.

Several thousand people gathered outside the Old Capitol building and overflowed onto nearby Monroe Street, as students, activists and Democratic lawmakers expressed anger amid chants of “We want change,” “Not one more,” “Throw them out,” and “Never again.”

Leslie Ovalle / WLRN News

Cheers and hugs welcomed a barefoot Jorge Sempere as he finished a 12-mile journey from West Boca Community High School and arrived at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland Tuesday morning to protest gun violence in the wake of the school’s massacre.

He and other students from West Boca High walked out of their school campus to show solidarity with their neighboring peers, some of whom had just embarked on a lobbying trip to Tallahassee.

Miami Herald

Hundreds of students from West Boca Raton High School walked out of class Tuesday morning and headed toward Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School to show solidarity with the students who lived through last week’s horror-filled shooting rampage.

Miami Herald Archive

Miami-Dade County’s school system wants an extra $30 million this year from Florida to better prepare classrooms for a mass-shooting era — with bulletproof glass, advanced monitoring of social media and social workers trying to spot troubled students before they erupt in violence.

The requested state money would let Miami-Dade hire more police and mental-health workers, beef up school security with automatically locking doors and upgraded public announcement systems, and purchase software and hire staff to mine social media for potential threats.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

South Miami Mayor Philip Stoddard may be one of the most liberal mayors in Florida, so he would be a natural candidate to push through a package of local gun-control rules in the wake of the Parkland massacre 50 miles away. But that would be against the law.

Florida bans cities and counties from imposing their own gun-control rules. Seven years ago, the Republican-controlled Legislature even created a $5,000 fine it can impose on mayors like Stoddard if they ever try to enforce stricter regulations on firearms.

Students from the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, are heading to Tallahassee Tuesday, where they’ll meet with state legislators and rally Wednesday, demanding stronger gun laws including assault weapons bans. But not all those legislators are convinced that gun bans are the way to prevent massacres.

Following last week’s mass school shooting, about 100 Parkland students are expected to come to Tallahassee this week to speak to Florida lawmakers about gun control. It comes just as an NRA-backed bill was withdrawn from consideration. But, some may see the student’s gun control views as a bit “naive.”

Odalis Garcia / WLRN

Monday night's rain was not an obstacle for more than a hundred people who showed up at  Betti Stradling Park in Coral Springs, just five minutes from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, to participate in one of the several candlelight vigils organized by the Florida Parent Teacher Association (PTA) around the state to honor the victims of the Parkland shooting. 

Susan Stocker / Sun Sentinel via Miami Herald

After last week’s school shooting in Parkland that killed 17 people, a lot of focus has fallen on the home where the confessed shooter was living. WLRN spoke with the father of that family about the young man’s mental health issues – and about issues of gun ownership.

As the victims of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting are being remembered across South Florida this week, hundreds from the Parkland community came to remember 14-year-old Jaime Guttenberg on Sunday, as well as 15 year-old Luke Hoyer and 14-year old Alaina Petty on Monday morning. 

 

Nikolas Cruz
Sun Sentinel

Shackled and wearing a red jump suit, school shooter Nikolas Cruz made his first live appearance in a Broward County circuit court five days after he walked into Marjory Stoneman Douglas High and fatally shot 17 people in the worst school shooting in Florida history.

Cruz, a slightly built teen, did not say anything and never looked up at the crowd from his seat at the defense table. It was a tense atmosphere — Cruz was surrounded by Broward Sheriff’s deputies as media members and other lawyers watched from the gallery.

Teresa Frontado

The grief and mourning continue for the 17 dead students and staff killed in last week’s mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland. But something else is happening among the anguish of the interrupted lives of the victims and survivors. Out of the agony — activism.

 

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