medicaid expansion

Medicaid Patients Face Changes In Health Plans

Sep 19, 2018

About 600,000 low-income patients will be assigned to new Medicaid managed-care plans in the coming months after the state ended contracts with their existing plans.

Flickr Creative Commons

It’s been over three years since the Florida Legislature debated -- and rejected -- a proposal to expand Medicaid. Expansion would make hundreds of thousands of uninsured Floridians eligible for the government healthcare insurance program for low-income people.

Thirty-three states, as well as the District of Columbia, have expanded the program. The most recent was Virginia where, after five years of heated debate, a slim Republican majority in the state Senate approved a budget that would expand Medicaid.

Will 2019 be the year Florida follows suit?

Drop In Sudden Cardiac Arrests Linked To Obamacare

Jun 29, 2017

If 22 million Americans lose their health care coverage by 2026 under the GOP Senate’s plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, how many people could die? The question is at the heart of the debate raging in Washington, D.C., but has been difficult to answer.

Florida’s most vocal advocacy group on health issues will lay off all five of its employees next month as an indirect result of the Republican sweep in the Nov. 8 election.

Katie Lepri / WLRN

Obamacare’s namesake came to Miami-Dade County Thursday afternoon to talk about the Affordable Care Act, just a few weeks before the program’s fourth open enrollment period starts.

President Barack Obama, before heading to a Hillary Clinton campaign rally in Miami Gardens, spoke to a large crowd of mostly students at Miami Dade College Wolfson Campus.

WUSF

It's a busy Monday morning at the St. Petersburg Free Clinic, and Philip Ertel is here for a check-up. The 60-year-old needs refills for his diabetes and cholesterol medications. 

Dr. Trudy Grossman pulls out a stethoscope and checks his lungs. He takes deep breaths in and out.

Ertel works full-time in a restaurant at a hotel on St. Pete Beach, but he doesn't have health insurance because he can't afford the monthly premiums.

Flickr

The Internet allows savvy consumers to comparison shop for big ticket items. Those items may soon include medical procedures.

The Florida House is ready to consider a bill (HB 1175) that would enable consumers to see what hospitals around the state charge for similar surgeries and courses of treatment.

 

Waiting More Than Two Years For A Diagnosis

Feb 8, 2016
Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Right now, almost a million people in Florida don’t qualify for Medicaid because they make too much money or don’t have any dependents. But they also make too little money to get help buying health insurance through the Affordable Care Act. The resulting space between the two programs is often called the Medicaid coverage gap.

  With the third year of open enrollment under way on Healthcare.gov, President Barack Obama is focusing his efforts on people eligible to buy policies on the insurance marketplace.

Political battles over expanding Medicaid in states including Florida are important, but not as easy to win, he told WUSF in an Oval Office interview Thursday.

The 22 states that didn't expand Medicaid eligibility as part of Obamacare last year saw their costs to provide health care to the poor rise twice as fast as states that extended benefits to more low-income residents.

It's a counterintuitive twist for those states whose governors, most Republicans who opposed the Affordable Care Act, chose not to accept federal funds to extend Medicaid to more people.

Wikimedia / Illustration by Maria Murriel

The regular session of the Florida Legislature came to an abrupt end in late April as the House disagreed with the Senate over Medicaid expansion. The Senate wants to use federal dollars for expansion, while the House and Gov. Rick Scott want no expansion.

Lawmakers returned to Tallahassee last week for a special session to finish work on their one required duty: creating a state budget that goes into effect July 1.

freedigitalphotos.net

Today on the Florida Roundup, the state of affordable housing in Miami: More than a third of the population is spending more than half of their income on housing, according to a New York University study. Some experts worry that this will contribute to brain drain in South Florida. 

The Florida House is expected to reject the Senate's modified health care plan on Friday, leaving the legislature where it's been for the last few months -- deadlocked.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

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