South America

Federal prosecutors in Brazil are accusing U.S. journalist Glenn Greenwald of criminal association over his role in spreading hacked messages from Brazilian officials' phones that suggest collusion between a judge and prosecutors in the conviction and jailing of a former president.

A Glimpse Of Paraguay's Japanese Community

Dec 17, 2019

Upon first glance, Ricardo Nagaoka's photographs look like they're of Japan. Asian faces are surrounded by hallmarks of Japanese culture: ikebana, origami, baseball and kimonos. It's subverting this expectation that delights him the most.

"We read these visual cues and we instinctively say, 'Oh, this is probably in Japan,'" Nagaoka says. "I like making images that challenge what we initially believe."

Opinion: O, How Bolivia's Mighty Morales Has Fallen

Dec 4, 2019

Raúl Peñaranda is a Bolivian journalist, former Nieman journalism fellow at Harvard University and author of a book on former President Evo Morales' efforts to control the media in Bolivia. Peñaranda is the editor of the news site Brújula Digital.

Florida Lt. Gov. Jeanette Nunez is wrapping up a trade mission to Colombia on Wednesday with a delegation that included 19 Florida companies hoping to start or expand trade with the South American country.

Updated at 8:46 p.m. ET

Evo Morales has announced that he is leaving for Mexico, which offered him asylum after he resigned as president of Bolivia.

A number of urgent questions face the nation and its neighbors: Who's in charge? How would a successor be chosen? And should the sudden upheaval be regarded as a military coup or a democratic uprising?

Chilean President Sebastian Piñera announced a major reshuffle of his cabinet the day after a massive demonstration in the streets of the capital in the latest anti-government protests over economic inequality.

"We have all heard and understood the message of Chileans. I have asked all ministers to make their positions available. We're working to form a new team that represents change," Piñera tweeted on Saturday, in an effort to assuage the anger of protesters.

Bolivia's President Evo Morales looked set to win reelection without a runoff, declaring outright victory as he pushed back against critics who dispute the results, accusing them of trying to stage a coup.

Preliminary results released after Sunday's vote suggested that Morales would face a runoff election with his main rival, former President Carlos Mesa. But as the counting has continued, Morales' lead has mounted.

Rafael Urdaneta Rojas / AP

Are Venezuela and Colombia headed for war? Believe it or not, that's the big worry in South America right now.

Six volunteer firefighters use machetes to cut a path through the vines and underbrush of the Chiquitano forest in Bolivia's eastern lowlands. They're approaching the leading edge of a fire that's been burning for hours.

They attempt to smother it with shovelfuls of dirt and water they carry on their backs in tanks normally used to fumigate crops. But the smoke is getting thicker, the heat stronger and swirling winds push the flames forward. Realizing they are overmatched, José Zapata, the only trained firefighter among the group, orders his men to pull out.

Amid the chaos and misery that have engulfed Venezuela lies a strange parcel of tranquility, tucked within a valley surrounded by poplar trees and mountains some 20 miles south of the Caribbean coast.

It is a field populated by dozens of lanky teenage boys who are spending this particular evening — as they often do — galloping around the grass in pursuit of an oval ball.

These impoverished Venezuelans are training in the skills of a sport not often seen in a South American nation that's mad about soccer, baseball and horse racing: They are playing rugby.

MASS COMMUNICATION SPECIALIST 2ND CLASS MORGAN K. NALL / U.S. NAVAL FORCES SOUTHERN COMMAND

Medical staff aboard the U.S. Navy’s hospital ship Comfort said they are seeing a surge of patients who fled Venezuela on recent port stops in Ecuador, Peru, Costa Rica and Panama, where it was docked Thursday.

“I would say 25 to 30 percent of the patients I see in these primary clinics are Venezuelan migrants,” said Navy medic Lt. Cmdr. Jean Fortunado.

Martin Chahin / DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

The U.S. is working with Colombia, Brazil and other regional partners on how to assist Venezuela if the embargo-like sanctions announced by the White House this week ultimately force President Nicolás Maduro to step down, the head of the U.S. Southern Command said.

Navy Adm. Craig Faller, the Miami-based head of U.S. forces in South America, said the nations are working on “planning and discussing what we could do, and will do for the ‘day after Maduro,’ when there’s a legitimate government, when we can go in and really assist the people of Venezuela.”

Updated July 2 at 9 a.m. ET

Billions of fish in the Pacific Ocean will be treated to an awe-inspiring celestial event today. That's because a total solar eclipse will be visible over a huge swath of the southern Pacific.

Land animals including humans in Chile and Argentina will also get to observe the total spectacle, as will anybody connected to the Internet. And most parts of South America will be able to see a partial eclipse.

Updated at 4:15 a.m. ET on Monday:

The lights came back on late Sunday for some 44 million people in Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay after the sudden collapse of an interconnected South American power grid.

At about 7 a.m., the Edesur electric utility tweeted that "a massive failure" left Argentina and Uruguay without power. Electricity was not fully restored until late in the day.

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