Alexander Gonzalez

Associate Producer

Alexander Gonzalez produces the afternoon newscasts airing during All Things Considered. He enjoys helping tell the South Florida story through audio and digital platforms. Alex is interested in a little of everything from business to culture to politics.

 

A Miami native, Alex has been in the journalism game since high school. He was editor of his high school and college newspapers. After graduating from the University of Miami, he first arrived at WLRN as the summer 2015 digital intern. He reported on Latin American communities in Miami, the city’s burgeoning arts culture, and a grassroots group of mango collectors.

 

Before returning to Miami, Alex lived in New York, where he earned his master’s in journalism from NYU. In between, he also spent a year teaching English in France on a Fulbright grant.

 

In his spare time, Alex looks for discount books and listens to podcasts – his favorites include “Death, Sex & Money,” “Spooked” and “99% Invisible.”

Alexander Gonzalez / WLRN

Miami nightlife runs on music and DJs are the maestros of that scene. It’s an industry heavily represented by men. But a group of women in a DJ class wants to drop just as many beats.

Jose Iglesias / Miami Herald

Two undocumented immigrants who were arrested for driving without a license and face deportation are suing Miami-Dade County over its immigration detention policy. The lawsuit was filed in federal court this week, claiming the county’s policy is unconstitutional.

 

Jesse Wagstaff via Flickr

The cost of recycling programs has doubled in some Broward County cities.

 

This month, the price increased when previous contracts with Sun Bergeron expired. Part of that company is now owned by Waste Management, which cities are blaming for the price hike.

Caroline Davis2010 via Flickr

For years, the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office had a backlog of rape kits, which contain DNA evidence that could link a suspect to a victim. Some of those kits dated back to the 1980s. In recent years, the agency spent $1 million to test nearly 1,000 kits.

power lines FPL
Al Diaz / Miami Herald

Hurricane Irma was a game-changer for South Florida. Cities are preparing for hurricane season differently now. And the region’s largest utility, Florida Power & Light, is pushing for a method that could turn the lights back on faster after a storm.

It’s called undergrounding. A lot of people think of it as the solution for keeping the power on. But that’s not necessarily how it works.

C.M. Guerrero / Miami Herald

None of the more than 1,000 nursing homes and assisted living facilities in South Florida are on Florida Power & Light’s highest priority list for power restoration.

 

FPL rejected Broward and Miami-Dade counties’ lists, which included these facilities, according to the Sun Sentinel.

Associated Press

About two million Venezuelans are fleeing the economic and political crisis in their country and seeking refuge in neighboring countries, including Colombia, Ecuador and Peru.

READ MORE: Escape from Venezuela.

Sammy Mack / WLRN

A Palm Beach Post investigation has uncovered Florida's role in igniting the country’s heroin epidemic in 2011.

 

The state’s repeated failure to control its own prescription drug problem would eventually lead to more addicts turning to heroin not only on Florida, but in other states around the country. 

Screenshot/MakeMusicDay.org

All of Miami will be dropping beats Thursday.

    

The city is marking the longest day of the year – officially the summer solstice – with a lineup of free musical performances. 

Make Music Miami is joining the worldwide celebration Make Music Day, which began in Paris in 1982 as Fête de la Musique. More than 800 cities in 120 countries carry on the spirit of the day – that all musicians can play in public spaces.

Dan Mullan/Getty Images

The first few matches of this year’s FIFA World Cup have been seismic.

Mexico literally shook the ground after beating Germany –a highlight for some fans like Susan Dirgins-Friend, who's from California and lives in Davie.

"Though I am not Latin, Mexico, Mexicans and Mexican Americans are close to my heart," she says.

Kim Jong Un
KRT via AP Video

President Donald Trump came to Miami one year ago, on June 16, 2017, to announce he was rolling back some of the Obama-era changes in America’s Cuban policy. In doing so, Trump went after the communist dictatorship on the island.

 

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

The threat of sea-level rise stretches well beyond the coastline.

Courtesy of Harry Castiblanco

Since January, the Teatro Trail in Little Havana has been showing the play, “Tres Viudas en un Crucero” (“Three Widows on a Cruise”), to sold-out crowds. The Spanish-language production featured a blackface character. A fair-skinned actress wore brown face makeup and overdrawn big red lips.

 

The theater recently decided to eliminate blackface from the play after an El Nuevo Herald report denouncing it. 

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

The lull lasted more than a decade. A major storm hadn’t made landfall in South Florida since the 2004-2005 double-hitter of Hurricanes Wilma and Katrina.

That record ended this past September when Hurricane Irma rocked the region and much of the Caribbean.

The Category 5 storm first made landfall in Barbuda with maximum winds of nearly 180 mph. The hurricane then ripped through St. Martin, the British and U.S. Virgin Islands, Turks and Caicos, the Bahamas and Cuba.

Discoizzy / Wikimedia Commons

Ernesto Rodriguez, spokesperson for Miami Beach Police, says authorities will approach Memorial Day weekend "like a stadium."

Pages