Chris Remington

Radio Producer

Chris Remington knew he wanted to work in public radio beginning in middle school, as WHYY played in his car rides to and from school in New Jersey. He’s freelanced for All Things Considered and was a desk associate for CBS Radio News in New York City. Most recently, he was producing for Capital Public Radio’s Insight booking guests, conducting research and leading special projects at Sacramento’s NPR affiliate.

South Florida is at the intersection of Latin American politics, has become a start-up capital and is a cultural beacon for the world. As a producer for Sundial, Chris wants to spotlight the stories of the diverse community that makes the region shine. Send him your pitches at Sundial@wlrnnews.org.

STACY GOLDATE AND CRAIG COLTON / Courtesy

A new documentary examines the role one retirement community in Broward County is playing in shaping Florida's politics.

As the 2018 midterms are rapidly approaching, there’s a segment of the population in South Florida that will have a definitively large impact on the election -- seniors.

The Wynmoor retirement community in Broward County is indicative of that power. They've hosted Joe Biden, Charlie Crist and many other high profile politicians on the campaign trail.

Stacy Goldate and Craig Colton

There are a dozen possible constitutional amendendments on the November ballot in Florida. A number of the measures are considered controversial and there's been public criticism over the bundling together of amendments. (For instance,  Amendment 9 bundles together the smoking of e-cigarettes indoors and ending the practice of offshore drilling.) Tim Cerio was a member of the Constitutional Revision Commission that crafted some of these amendments.

Brian Demby / Courtesy

Miami’s Lemon City Trio (LCT) is bringing a fresh new meaning to the word funk.

Brian Robertson, 35, on organ; Nick Tannura, 28, on guitars and Aaron Glueckauf, 27, on drums are the musicians behind the funky jazz-soul sound that makes up Lemon City Trio. They met in Miami, decided to join forces to create a band and began rehearsing at a warehouse located in the Lemon City, a neighborhood in Miami that dates back to the mid-19th Century and overlaps now with Little Haiti.

Brian Vest / Courtesy

One year ago, South Florida awoke to the destruction wrought by Hurricane Irma.

The storm had slammed into the Florida Keys as a Category 4 storm, bringing catastrophic winds and rain. According to the National Hurricane Center, the storm surge and tide produced flooding of 5 to 8 feet in the Lower Keys and winds reached 120-mph in Big Pine Key.

The storm left piles of torn down trees, couches, porta-potties, refrigerators, furniture and other debris across the islands.

Over the past year, South Florida has worked to rebuild. WLRN's Sundial producers traveled to the Keys to talk to Lynda Wells, Douglas Mader and Brian Vest, three Florida Keys residents with one mission: to help improve the lives of people in their community after the hurricane.

You can hear/read their stories below. 


STEVE MITCHELL / AP FILE PHOTO

The race for Florida governor recently got a bit more interesting for Democrats. Real estate billionaire Jeff Greene joined the race just a few weeks ago. He's competing against Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum, former Congresswoman Gwen Graham, former Miami Beach Mayor Philip Levine and Orlando businessman Chris King.

The Palm Beach County businessman has made education a signature platform for his campaign; he started his own private school in 2016.

AdamFirst via Wikimedia Commons

The Miami-Dade County commissioners discuss on Wednesday the future of the 836 extension proposal. It’s a hotly debated topic, as traffic issues tend to be in South Florida. The Miami-Dade Expressway Authority (MDX), the organization behind the construction of the extension, argue it's necessary for alleviating congestion on major roadways from Kendall to Miami. But environmental groups are raising concerns that the freeway runs too close to the Urban Boundary Development line, established a few miles from the borders of Everglades National Park.