NRA

NRA Lobbyist Files Lawsuits Over 'Hate And Vitriol'

Jul 13, 2018
KRT/Newscom

Marion Hammer, the National Rifle Association’s influential Tallahassee lobbyist, filed federal and state lawsuits Friday seeking more than $2 million in damages from five men she says have targeted her over her Second Amendment advocacy following the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland.

Peter Haden / WLRN

Dozens of activists staged a “die-in” near President Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate in West Palm Beach Tuesday on the second anniversary of the mass shooting at Pulse nightclub in Orlando that killed 49 people.

‘Jane Doe’ Divides Attorney General Candidates

Jun 5, 2018

Republicans running to replace Attorney General Pam Bondi disagree with her legal stand against a 19-year-old Alachua County woman who wants to remain anonymous in a National Rifle Association challenge to a new state gun restriction.

Publix Halts Political Contributions Ahead Of Parkland Students' 'Die-In' Protest

May 25, 2018
Jose Iglesias / Miami Herald

Staring down the prospect of a public relations crisis — boycott threats and "die-in" protests included — over its donations to Republican gubernatorial hopeful Adam Putnam, Publix said Friday it has halted all corporate political contributions.

The supermarket giant made the announcement moments before a "die-in" protest planned by David Hogg, a vocal Parkland school shooting survivor and gun control activist. Despite the news, Hogg and dozens of protesters sprawled on the floor of a Coral Springs Publix for 12 minutes clutching sunflowers and signs that read "No NRA Money."

NRA Appeals Ruling On ‘Jane Doe’ In Gun Case

May 20, 2018

The National Rifle Association is appealing a federal judge’s refusal to keep the identity of a 19-year-old Alachua County woman secret in a challenge to a state law that raised the age to purchase rifles and other long guns.

AP

Survivors of the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, took to social media to express outrage and heartbreak in the aftermath of the Friday school shooting in Texas, where authorities say a gunman opened fire, killing 10 people.

Updated 3:09 p.m. ET

A federal judge in Florida has decided that the National Rifle Association cannot use pseudonyms for teenagers who want to buy guns as part of a legal challenge against new gun laws in Florida.

The judge expressed sympathy for the teenagers, acknowledging that they probably would suffer extreme harassment if their names were public. But, he wrote with evident reluctance, the law was clear that pseudonyms were not allowed.

Updated at 3:10 p.m. ET

Retired Marine Lt. Col. Oliver North, infamous for his involvement in the Iran-Contra scandal in the 1980s, will be the next president of the National Rifle Association, the organization says in a statement.

Thousands of gun enthusiasts have walked into Dallas' Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center to revel in displays of firearms and hunting accessories at the National Rifle Association's annual convention — but some crowds are staying outside to protest what they believe is a dire problem in America.

Associated Press

President Trump and Vice President Pence speak to the National Rifle Association in Dallas Friday. It's the second year in a row Trump has addressed the gun lobby organization, which was a strong backer of his 2016 campaign.

This year' s speeches come amid renewed debate over gun laws, following school shootings in Parkland, Florida and elsewhere.

READ MORE: Anguish and Activism, The Stoneman Douglas High School Shooting

President Trump will speak at the National Rifle Association's annual convention on Friday, a little more than two months after he pledged to stand up to the gun rights organization in the aftermath of the Parkland, Fla., school shooting.

Tens of thousands of gun owners are gathering in Dallas for the National Rifle Association's annual convention, as the group's leadership rallies its rank-and-file in a political climate altered by the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., and the student protests that followed.

The aftermath of the mass shooting, which cost 17 lives, makes this an important moment for the NRA. While its leaders remain insistent that more gun control will not stop such carnage, some acknowledge a shift in the way the country is talking about firearms.

Updated at 9:05 a.m. ET

Victims of the Parkland, Fla., high school shooting and their parents are criticizing the National Rifle Association after it announced that gun advocates won't be allowed to bring weapons to watch Vice President Pence deliver the NRA-Institute for Legislative Action's leadership forum keynote address in Dallas on Friday.

The NRA says the ban was ordered by the U.S. Secret Service.

The National Rifle Association has accepted contributions from about 23 Russians, or Americans living in Russia, since 2015, the gun rights group acknowledged to Congress.

The NRA said in a letter to Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., unveiled on Wednesday, that the sum it received from those people was just over $2,500 and most of that was "routine payments" for membership dues or magazine subscriptions.

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