sea-level rise

John O'Connor / StateImpact Florida

The group Code for Miami aims to develop data- and technology-based solutions to local quality-of-life challenges. On Saturday, as part of a "National Day of Civic Hacking," they're inviting other local programmers and civic-minded volunteers to help them tackle some of South Florida's pressing issues.

Susan Jacobson, a journalism professor at Florida International University and a longtime Code for Miami participant, says this weekend’s event will include coding projects on transit and ocean pollution as well as sea-level rise.

Riane Roldan / WLRN

There's a buzzword among people who work on quality-of-life issues in South Florida: "Resilience."

It’s a concept we often apply to a person, someone who's able to cope with difficult circumstances. But more and more, the word is being used in the context of how communities respond to issues like traffic, hurricanes, affordable housing and rising seas.

Florida House of Representatives

State Rep. Kristin Jacobs says Florida must do more to address sea-level rise and other water-related issues as the state faces increasing threats from climate change.

Jacobs, a Democrat, is running for reelection after representing parts of Northwest Broward County in District 96 since 2014.

Floydphoto / Wikimedia Commons

ReThink Energy Florida and First Street Foundation are hosting a series of Tidal Town Halls where politicians will address the threat of sea level rise in Florida as part of the 2018 midterm election cycle.

The Ft. Lauderdale Tidal Town Hall will be on Wednesday from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Nova Southeastern University at 3301 College Ave. in Fort Lauderdale. Click on the link above for details.

José Iglesias / Miami Herald

Rep. Carlos Curbelo took an election-year risk Monday when he unveiled a plan to tax greenhouse gas emissions.

climate change
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

More than 100 people answered the call from local students to march through downtown Fort Lauderdale on Saturday asking for action on climate change. 

'This Is Zero Hour' is a national climate change awareness and action campaign, but a group of recent graduates from American Heritage in Plantation organized a local campaign march that began in Esplanade Park. 

Faith Ward said she didn't feel like student activism had much of an impact before the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas on February 14.

Kate Stein / WLRN

South Florida could see two feet or more of sea-level rise over the next 40 years. It’s alarming. 

 

And there’s growing concern that the risk of rising seas could sink South Florida’s economy before the water even gets here.

The dense network of cables that make up the Internet is likely to be inundated with saltwater as sea levels rise, a new analysis suggests, putting thousands of miles of critical infrastructure along U.S. coastlines underwater in the next 15 years.

power lines FPL
Al Diaz / Miami Herald

Hurricane Irma was a game-changer for South Florida. Cities are preparing for hurricane season differently now. And the region’s largest utility, Florida Power & Light, is pushing for a method that could turn the lights back on faster after a storm.

It’s called undergrounding. A lot of people think of it as the solution for keeping the power on. But that’s not necessarily how it works.

Kate Stein / WLRN

After Hurricane Irma, some people with low-wage jobs took weeks to recover the costs of supplies and days of missed work. In parts of the Florida Keys, people spent months rebuilding homes and businesses.

Hector Gabino / El Nuevo Herald

Within the next 30 years — the same time span for a home mortgage — 64,000 homes in South Florida are expected to experience regular flooding, according to a new report from the Union of Concerned Scientists. 

One out of every six of those homes are in Miami Beach. 

This report, part of an FCIR series on climate change, was produced in partnership with WMFE, the NPR member station in Orlando. The Florida Center for Investigative Reporting is a nonprofit news organization supported by foundations and individual contributions. For more information, visit fcir.org.

YANKEETOWN, Florida – While Florida state government bans the terms “climate change” and “global warming” in official business, this coastal fishing village of about 500 people and more water than dry land is being swallowed by the sea with almost no public attention or concern.

But town officials here are fighting back with some success.

Related Group

Many people tend to think of Miami as a car dominant, traffic heavy metropolis. Yet, the city is becoming more pedestrian friendly. An ongoing project by real estate group The Related Group and Miami’s Downtown Development Authority seeks to make Miami a top destination for walking, living and vacation.

Similar to The Highline in New York City, a new project called The Biscayne Line would be a 15-mile long public walkway that stretches from Downtown Brickell to the Design District.

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

If current sea-level rise trends continue, the ocean that makes many South Florida cities desirable places to live may become an existential threat.

Jessica Weiss

Matthew Schwartz, the director of the South Florida Wildlands Association, stands in a patch of marshy grass on a large stretch of land in northwest Miami-Dade county. Cypress trees dot the landscape, which sits just a few miles from the Everglades. The water is about six inches high, enough to cover his shoes.

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