Julio Ochoa

Julio Ochoa is editor of Health News Florida.

He comes to WUSF from The Tampa Tribune, where he began as a website producer for TBO.com and served in several editing roles, eventually becoming the newspaper’s deputy metro editor. 

Julio was born and raised in St. Petersburg, and received a bachelor’s degree from Florida State University. He earned a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Colorado and worked at a paper in Greeley, Colo., before returning to Florida as a reporter and as breaking news editor for the Naples Daily News.

Contact Julio at 813-974-8633, on Twitter at @julioochoa or email julioochoa@wusf.org.

Lauren Killgore first learned about her health insurance company’s new policy at the beginning of 2017, when her husband, a 26-year-old hemophiliac, had an internal bleed in his knee. 

A 10- to 11-foot alligator broke into a woman’s home in Clearwater early Friday and thrashed about, breaking wine bottles and knocking over furniture while a trapper removed it, police said.

The number of children covered by Medicaid declined in Florida and other states for the first time in more than a decade.

Funding within this year’s budget could help thousands of children get health insurance.

More than 100,000 low-income parents could lose  health care coverage under a Medicaid work-requirement bill being considered in the Florida Legislature, experts estimate.

Tampa businessman Joe Redner has lost the latest round in his attempt to grow his own medical marijuana for juicing.

Florida's largest medical marijuana licensee has settled a lawsuit with the state over how many dispensaries it can open.

Florida's prisons have a health care problem.

The state's aging prison population and the high cost of treating inmates with debilitating diseases are behind a surge in spending on health care in recent years.


It's not even 6 a.m. when Amy and Christie begin a 45 minute drive south. 

The two friends are headed to a clinic in Hernando County where they’ll get a dose of methadone. They take this trip seven days a week, they said, to keep from relapsing into the pill addiction that nearly destroyed their lives.

Six disabled and elderly Floridians are suing the state over alleged violations of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

The number of Floridians who enrolled in the Affordable Care Act this year increased by more than 55,000 compared to last year.

Medicaid enrollees in Florida will have a much shorter window to apply thanks to a change approved by the federal government. But the reason given for the change doesn't add up for some.

The state starts rolling out new Medicaid managed care plans on Saturday and some are worried about the impacts to Florida’s most vulnerable children.

A new health insurer in Florida filed a motion to immediately block Florida Blue from contracting exclusively with insurance brokers. 

There's less than a month left to enroll for health insurance plans on the Affordable Care Act marketplace and so far this year fewer people have been signing up.

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