Stephanie Colombini

.05pt">Stephanie Colombini joined WUSF Public Media in December 2016 as Producer of Florida Matters, WUSF’s public affairs show. She’s also a reporter for WUSF’s Health News Florida project.

.05pt">Stephanie was born and raised just outside New York City. She graduated from Fordham University in the Bronx, where she got her start in radio at NPR member station WFUV in 2012. In addition to reporting and anchoring, Stephanie helped launch the news department’s first podcast series, Issues Tank.

.05pt">Prior to joining the WUSF family, Stephanie spent a year reporting for CBS Radio’s flagship station WCBS Newsradio 880 in Manhattan. Her assignments included breaking news stories such as the 2016 bombings in Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood and Seaside Park, NJ and political campaigns. As part of her job there, she was forced to – and survived – a night of reporting on New Year’s Eve in Times Square.

.05pt">Her work in feature reporting and podcast production has earned her awards from the Public Radio News Directors, Inc. and the Alliance for Women in Media.

.05pt">While off-the-clock, you might catch Stephanie at a rock concert, on a fishing boat or anywhere that serves delicious food.


Like many long-term care facilities, VA nursing homes haven't allowed in-person visitation since early March. The separation has been hard on veterans and their families.

The number of new COVID-19 cases has gone up in Florida in the past week, with the state and Tampa Bay area reporting some of their highest figures since the pandemic began. This comes a month after the state began reopening for business and recreation.

But data on new cases alone doesn't paint a complete picture about coronavirus in Florida.

The Universal Orlando Resort theme parks are reopening today after being closed for more than two months due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Researchers and elected officials are demanding answers from the state amid reports that it fired a scientist who was managing Florida's COVID-19 dashboard for "refusing to manipulate data."

Nearly 30 percent of coronavirus deaths in Florida are linked to nursing homes and assisted-living facilities. Residents of these facilities are especially vulnerable to get COVID-19, as are the staff taking care of them.

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State officials have been meeting to decide when to re-open Florida, as the number of new confirmed coronavirus cases appears to stabilize — though the numbers have been more volatile in some places, including Miami-Dade. And Florida cases were up again earlier this week. Public health experts say opening things up too soon could be dangerous.

Health News Florida's Stephanie Colombini talks about potential next steps with Dr. Marissa Levine, a public health professor at the University of South Florida.

Florida lawmakers are considering a bill that would give survivors of childhood sexual assault a "look back window" to address previously unreported claims. It would allow them one year to open cases with an expired statute of limitations.


The VA has eliminated the designated smoking areas at its hospitals, clinics, and other buildings. Many are celebrating the ban for creating a healthier environment at the VA, but the transition has been difficult for some patients and workers.

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This week on Florida Matters, we share some of our favorite discussions about plants, animals and environmental challenges facing our state.

A new study calculates how many dangerously hot days the nation's military bases could experience over the next few decades if no action is taken to reduce carbon emissions – and Florida’s bases top the list.

Military health officials say troops are engaging in more high-risk sexual behavior, and part of the reason might be the popularity of smartphone dating apps.

A growing number of programs try to treat PTSD by getting veterans into nature, even deep under the sea. 

Florida's coral reefs are in trouble. Scientists say they've been declining for decades.

But researchers have very recently come up with some exciting results that they say show promise in restoring these beautiful and important marine communities.

Wildlife officials spent Monday rescuing a group of five whales that beached themselves on Redington Beach that morning.

Officials with Clearwater Marine Aquarium used trucks and boats to transport the whales to safe locations.

By Robin Sussingham, Stephanie Colombini, Steve Newborn and Cathy Carter.

They’ve had to battle shark attacks, pollution, massive beach developments and confusing light sources, but sea turtles are bouncing back.

With nesting season well underway, Florida Matters host Robin Sussingham speaks with experts about how sea turtles are faring and efforts to protect them in our state.


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