Ben Carson

Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson made a visit to Baltimore on Wednesday and renewed his defense of President Trump's disparaging comments about the city, and reiterated his own critique of the city where he lived for more than three decades.

"There are good things in Baltimore. There are bad things in Baltimore," Carson told reporters near a recently renovated affordable housing development. "But there are problems and we can't sweep them under the rug."

Aaron Sánchez-Guerra / WLRN

After decades of squalid living conditions, one of the nation’s oldest public housing complexes is receiving an overdue transformation.

Ben Carson, the secretary of Housing and Urban Development, who has been relatively quiet since the shutdown began in December, issued a challenge to elected officials to set their egos aside to resolve the longest partial government shutdown in U.S. history.

"We can continue to hope that our leaders will recognize that this is an easy problem to solve. I mean, just take your ego out of it," Carson said.

Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson wants Americans living on housing assistance to put more of their income toward rent and he wants to give public housing authorities the ability to impose work requirements on tenants.

Under current law, most tenants who get federal housing assistance pay 30 percent of their adjusted income toward rent, and the government kicks in the rest up to a certain amount.

Updated at 10 p.m. ET

The chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform sent a letter to Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson Wednesday requesting "all documents and communications" related to the redecorating of his office and HUD's handling of a whistleblower.

When it comes to poor Americans, the Trump administration has a message: Government aid is holding many of them back. Without it, many more of them would be working.

Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Director Mick Mulvaney said as much when presenting the administration's budget plan this week to cut safety net programs by hundreds of billions of dollars over the next 10 years. The administration also wants to tighten work requirements for those getting aid, such as food stamps, or Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits.

Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson has been confirmed as the secretary of Housing and Urban Development, by a 58-41 Senate vote.

Six Democrats and one Independent joined with the Republicans to approve the nomination — mostly Democrats who are up for re-election next year and represent states that voted for President Trump, NPR's Arnie Seipel reports.

"Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, who received blowback from liberals for voting for Carson in committee, voted against his nomination today," Arnie says.

GOP presidential candidate Ben Carson on his book signing at Barnes and Noble in Fort Lauderdale.
Alyssa Méndez Batista

Republican presidential frontrunner Ben Carson’s lack of political experience is not an issue for his supporters.

"How many people have we had that has a lot of experience? And look what they have done to our country,” says real estate consultant Verna Miller, who attended Carson's book signing in Fort Lauderdale Thursday night.

Anyone who has watched any of the presidential debates knows the claims have been flying around fast and furious. So we're going to take on some of those claims from the recent debate in Boulder, Colorado, from the Florida-based candidates in a bit of a lightning round with Josh Gillen of PolitiFact Florida.

Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson said he would require background checks on all Syrian migrants and war refugees before allowing them into the United States.

Charles Trainor Jr. / Miami Herald

Five presidential candidates spoke to the National Urban League Conference in Fort Lauderdale Friday.

The conference, which runs through Saturday, focuses on improving jobs, justice and education in American cities.

 

Democratic and Republican candidates talked about how government can address the conference theme: “Save Our Cities.”

 

Former U.S. Senator and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton took a direct shot at Republican candidate Jeb Bush. Clinton said Bush isn’t living up to his campaign’s theme of “Right to Rise.”