climate

Provided to WMFE by Jim Rinaman

A team of researchers led by the University of Central Florida has been awarded a $3.4 million grant to develop a program to help home-buyers evaluate potential property risks from natural disasters.

The research team will use the grant to gather data, analyze it, and create a “Hazard Score” for every community, county, and state in the gulf region.

The next phase of the project aims to make their findings more publicly accessible by offering it through an easy-to-use app and websites such as Zillow and Trulia.

Miami Herald archives

Floridians have another year of reprieve before they face a likely hike in their flood insurance premiums, thanks to political pressure from Congress over a potentially drastic revamp to the National Flood Insurance Program.

The planned change to the way the NFIP charges policyholders is meant to claw the program out of its multibillion-dollar debts and help the nation adapt to the growing risk of climate change — in exchange for an end to the subsidies coastal residents have relied on for decades.

Source: Palm Beach County website

Planned burning for Okeeheelee Park in West Palm Beach started Monday.

The prescribed burning season will run through the end of May for the Okeeheelee Park Natural Area and through the end of October for Okeeheelee Park South – seven months and nearly a full year, respectively.

Greg Atkinson, Palm Beach County’s parks operations superintendent, said that long period is normal, and doesn’t mean residents should expect nonstop flames and smoke – park officials typically conduct fewer than 10 burns, lasting six to eight hours each, per year.

AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee

Ask any consumer — good credit goes a long way.

It works the same for local governments. Increasingly investors in the bonds of local governments want to know more about the risks those cities and counties face from climate change, and how those risks could affect the governments’ ability to repay their debts.

NOAA GOES satellite imagery

Hurricane Dorian's slow, destructive track through the Bahamas fits a pattern scientists have been seeing over recent decades, and one they expect to continue as the planet warms: hurricanes stalling over coastal areas and bringing extreme rainfall.

Aaron Sánchez-Guerra / WLRN

The City of Miami wants to hear from residents about their concerns over South Florida’s vulnerability to climate change.

The Office of Resilience and Sustainability launched a series of community discussions and workshops in Coconut Grove Monday night, called Climate Ready Miami. The meetings will go through September and then the city will then develop initiatives and strategies to respond to concerns.

Updated at 5:53 p.m. ET

People in Guadalajara, Mexico, woke up on Sunday to a thick blanket of ice over areas of their city, after a freak hailstorm that damaged houses and left cars partially buried.

This is particularly striking because it's the middle of summer. In the past month, temperatures most days have hit 90 degrees Fahrenheit or over.

Gerard Albert III / WLRN

The threat posed to Floridians by climate change is a daily reality: rising seas, hotter temperatures, more flooding and stronger hurricanes.

Leaders from nearly 200 countries, including the United States, are at a big climate conference in Poland this week. They are struggling to agree on rules for how to meet their national promises to reduce greenhouse gas emissions under the Paris climate agreement of 2015. The official U.S. position is making it difficult.

As the international climate summit in southern Poland enters its second and final week, most countries agree on the basic scientific facts: greenhouse gasses are causing climate change, and every country is feeling its effects.

But the United States, under the leadership of President Trump, has taken a different view. The administration questions the overwhelming scientific evidence suggesting that human activity is causing the climate to warm. As a result, the U.S., which has been a leader in past negotiations, is playing unpredictable role in this year's summit.

The warming climate means more intense rain in many places, and that's helping cause more frequent and more dangerous flash floods. In one example of just how quickly people can be caught up in them, you may have seen the video that went viral after a bride in New Jersey had to be rescued traveling from her wedding ceremony to the reception.

BENBILL / FLICKR

Living in the Florida Keys is life in paradise, but it comes at a cost. 

Day-to-day life in the Keys can be a struggle despite the natural beauty of the archipelago. Still, the affordability challenges, threats from hurricanes and risk of higher seas can't dilute the Conch spirit of independence, personal resiliency and individualism. 

Honeybees understand that "nothing" can be "something" that has numerical meaning, showing that they have a primitive grasp of the concept of zero.

That's according to a newly published study in Science, which shows that bees possess a mathematical ability once thought to exist only in dolphins, primates, birds and humans who are beyond the preschool years.

The final few days before President-elect Donald Trump takes the oath of office will be filled with a flurry of congressional activity, as the Senate holds confirmation hearings for eight more of his Cabinet nominees.

Most are expected to be fairly routine, but a few could be hot-button affairs, including hearings for Education Secretary-designate Betsy DeVos and Scott Pruitt, Trump's nominee to lead the Environmental Protection Agency.

This year's El Niño is shaping up to be a whopper — potentially surpassing the one in 1997, which was the strongest on record, the National Weather Service says.

That could be good news for drought-stricken California, but not-so-good for places such as the Philippines and Indonesia, which typically experience below-normal rainfall or drought conditions during El Niños.

Pages