Cuba

Ismael Francisco / AP

Cuba believes it has managed COVID-19 well enough to re-open the island this week to one of its most important economic sectors: tourism. But you won’t see any visitors riding in vintage cars down Havana’s Malecón.

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

Miami isn’t just the so-called capital of Latin America. It’s also a top dance floor for Latin American hypocrisies, right-footed or left-footed. And we’ve watched a dazzling performance of that South Florida fandango during the anti-racism protests – by folks who want to dance around the truth about Christopher Columbus and Che Guevara.

FIU LACC

Seven years ago, Miami native Frank Mora left the Pentagon and came home to take over Florida International University’s Kimberly Green Latin American and Caribbean Center, or LACC. Since then, Mora has turned the center into a more nationally important forum of conversation on Latin America.

U.S. Labels Cuban Medical Missions 'Forced Labor' In Human-Trafficking Report

Jun 25, 2020
Yamil Lage / AP

In a harshly worded report published Thursday, the United States described the international medical missions managed by the Cuban government as an example of “forced labor,” and kept Cuba on the blacklist of countries that do not do enough to fight human trafficking.

The official declaration comes after an intense campaign by the U.S. government, activists and international organizations to denounce alleged abuses in these medical brigades.

Netflix

The spies known as the Cuban Five are one of the most controversial stories in U.S.-Cuba relations – especially in Miami. A new movie about that bitter episode begins streaming on Friday – and it’s sure to be just as controversial in Miami as the real thing was.

Juan Karita / AP

COMMENTARY

Tuesday night the Trump Administration made the surprising if not stunning announcement that, for the first time ever, the U.S. is nominating an American to head the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). For many if not most Latin American and Caribbean governments, the news was more jarring than hearing a gringo tourist order dinner in Spanish.

In one of the most controversial moments of one of America’s most controversial presidencies, Donald Trump this month sent National Guard troops to Washington's D.C.'s Lafayette Square, near the White House. Pepper spray was fired to disperse what videos show were largely peaceful protesters demonstrating against police brutality and racism.

Trump says he supports the protesters’ cause. But his unusual military response has divided Americans – including Latin American expats here in South Florida.

Tim Padgett / WLRN News

This week the Trump administration will lay out new restrictions on remittances to Cuba. They could lead to a more drastic reduction in the amount of money sent to the island. Meanwhile, Cuba economy experts are studying how the U.S. can still keep that cash flowing to Cubans.

Andre Penner / AP

COMMENTARY

It’s a mystery why the Trump Administration chose Miami this week as one of only two major U.S. cities to be sent “riot teams” as protests against police brutality and racism sweep the nation.

But you can be fairly sure that that brief federal deployment impressed one very large group here in particular: conservative, voter-eligible Latin American expats, especially those who fled lawlessness in their home countries for the law and order of this one. And yet, Latin American expats are precisely the South Floridian voices that should be out in front of these angry marches – warning the rest of us.

The coronavirus has not spared the U.S. military court and prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, where legal proceedings have come to a virtual standstill due to the pandemic. That has critics of Guantánamo, which has cost taxpayers more than $6 billion despite finalizing only one conviction in nearly two decades, saying this is a chance to shut it down for good.

Minrex de Cuba

COMMENTARY

So, South Florida Cold War warriors, we hear you took offense at the commie claptrap coming out of Cuba this week.

Minrex de Cuba

Two weeks ago a lone gunman shot up the exterior of the Cuban embassy in Washington D.C. Now the Cuban government accuses the U.S. of not investigating what it calls a terrorist act.

Ramon Espinosa / AP

Cuba has officially registered fewer than 1700 COVID-19 cases. But new data released by one of the island’s most respected institutes suggests the number may be much higher.

Andrew Harnik / AP

These aren’t the best of times for Cuba. The COVID-19 crisis has deepened the communist island’s crippling economic shortages. And now, a gunman shot up the outside of Cuba’s embassy in Washington early Thursday morning.

Gobierno de Cuba (left); AP (right)

In Washington this month, President Trump announced the U.S. had just “bought a tremendous amount of hydroxychloroquine.” That’s the anti-malaria drug he insists is the most promising treatment for the new coronavirus, or COVID-19. "A game-changer,” the conservative leader likes to say.

In Havana, Eduardo Martínez – head of BioCubaFarma, communist Cuba’s state-run biotech and pharmaceutical industry – just as often touts the island’s anti-dengue drug interferon alpha 2B (or alfa 2b), which he and the government insist is a COVID-19 wonder drug.

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