drones

Leo A Daly / Courtesy

A Miami-based architect has made it his mission to design hospitals to be more resilient to seismic events and hurricanes. 

Eduardo Egea, from the firm Leo A Daly, has been designing hospitals for almost 25 years. After Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico, Egea came up with the idea to design a hospital that could ultimately help in the aftermath of a hurricane by using drones to get supplies to patients quickly and easily. “Drones are going to be part of our day-to-day tools that we will use in the future,” he said on Sundial. 

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

President Trump says he called off a Thursday strike on Iran ordered as retaliation for Iran's having shot down a U.S. drone. Trump said he canceled the attack shortly before it was to begin, after he was told 150 people would very likely be killed.

"We were cocked & loaded to retaliate last night on 3 different sights when I asked, how many will die," Trump said in a series of tweets Friday.

NASA

Two years ago, it looked as if Hurricane Irma would make a direct hit to South Florida. Hundreds of thousands of people were ordered to leave their homes. Many did and found emergency shelters with no room and gridlocked traffic.

Drones have become an increasingly popular tool for industry and government.

Electric utilities use them to inspect transmission lines. Oil companies fly them over pipelines. The Interior Department even deployed them to track lava flows at Hawaii's Kilauea volcano.

But the Department of Homeland Security is warning that drones manufactured by Chinese companies could pose security risks, including that the data they gather could be stolen.

Anyone who’s ever flown a drone can tell you – it’s not the easiest thing to do. Now imagine if the only way you could control that drone – is with your brain.

That’s the challenge 16 University of South Florida students faced recently at the school’s first ever Brain-Drone race.

Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

Some 100 South Florida middle schoolers powered up drones in the Adrienne Arsht Center’s Knight Concert Hall on Wednesday, turned on the ‘Cha Cha Slide’ and coordinated the machines so they flipped and turned along with the music. Other kids performed choreographed dances with the drones, tumbling into breakdancing. 

Package delivery by drone is one small step closer to reality today.

Federal regulators announced plans Monday to change rules to allow drone operators to fly their unmanned aerial vehicles over populated areas and at night, without having to get special permits.

Many drone operators and enthusiasts complain that federal regulations haven't kept pace with the technology, arguing that prohibitions on flying drones over people and at night are out of date.

The Federal Aviation Administration has issued a new regulation restricting unauthorized drone operations over 10 Department of Interior sites, including the Statue of Liberty and Mount Rushmore.

The announcement Thursday says the two federal agencies "have agreed to restrict drone flights up to 400 feet within the lateral boundaries" of the following sites:

  • Statue of Liberty National Monument, New York
  • Boston National Historical Park (U.S.S. Constitution), Boston

Holly Pretsky / WLRN

Drones and unmanned vehicles draw interest from people in all sorts of fields. That much was clear at the 94th Aero Squadron restaurant Monday evening.

About 65 people, including police and fire officials, hobbyists, entrepreneurs and educators were present for the launch of The Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) Miami satellite chapter.

Prav Yalamanchi, a filmmaker who used a drone to film parts of a virtual reality zombie movie called Zombie Beach in Lake Worth, was one of the enthusiasts who showed up for the meeting.  

After high school, Staff Sgt. Kimi wanted to go to art school, but she didn't have the money. So she joined the military.

Intelligence analysts like Kimi work with drone pilots and others in the Air Force to guide decisions about where to deploy weapons in the fight against ISIS and al-Qaida. (The U.S. Air Force won't release her last name because of the high-security work she does).

Near Esparto, in the beautiful Capay Valley region of central California, 1,400 young almond trees flourish in a century-old orchard overlooking the hills. Since November, they've stood in perfect rows without a hint of foliage — resting, naked and dormant, for the upcoming growing season. Their branches now swell with bright pastel blooms in preparation for pollination.

If a snake bites you in a remote Amazonian village like Pampa Hermosa, Peru, and the local doctor is out of the right anti-venom, it might be wise to prepare some goodbyes. The nearest resupply, in a town called Contamana, is up to six hours away by riverboat, and you might not last that long. But you might last 35 minutes, the travel time between Pampa Hermosa and Contamana as the drone flies.

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REUTERS/Khaled al-Hariri

The war in Syria has lots of people worried about the country's future. But some are also worried about preserving Syria's past.

Take the ancient city of Palmyra. ISIS militants destroyed part of it, and they rigged many of the sites there with explosives before they were driven out last spring.

So an architect working with the Syrian government had an idea: Send in a drone.

A Southwest Florida company is trying to prepare children for jobs operating unmanned aircrafts, as the industry continues to grow. Soaring Sky out of Fort Myers created a drone education curriculum. And it wants to implement this training in schools around the country.

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