health insurance

A new poll finds that rich people are much happier with their lives than poorer people. They're also far more likely to say they've achieved the American dream, that they're satisfied with their education, and that they're not anxious about the future.

Many people could have guessed all of that without a poll, of course. But the findings also show some striking differences — and some striking similarities — between the very richest and poorest Americans about what it takes to succeed in this country.

More than 1.9 million Floridians signed up for health coverage through the federal marketplace during the enrollment period that ended Dec. 17.

Updated at 8:28 p.m. ET

A federal appeals court panel in New Orleans has dealt another blow to the Affordable Care Act, agreeing with a lower-court judge that the portion of the health law requiring most people to have coverage is unconstitutional now that Congress has eliminated the tax penalty that was intended to enforce it.

But it is sending the case back to the lower court to decide how much of the rest of the law can stand in light of that ruling.

The Commonwealth Fund

Americans who get health insurance through their employers are finding their coverage unaffordable as out-of-pocket expenses have outpaced earnings over the past decade, according to a new study, which shows Floridians were especially hard hit.

Florida was one of the nine most expensive states for premium contributions, which equated to 8% or more of the median income in 2018, according to a study released Thursday by the Commonwealth Fund, a New York-based nonprofit that advocates for expanded health insurance coverage.

Sun Sentinel

After months of negotiation, Boca Raton Regional Hospital will begin accepting UnitedHealthcare insurance plans as of Dec. 1.

UnitedHealthcare members enrolled in employer-sponsored, individual, Medicare Advantage and Medicaid benefit plans will have network access to Boca Raton Regional Hospital, which was acquired by Baptist Health South Florida in July.

Several civil legal aid organizations in Florida have filed a federal class action lawsuit against the agencies that operate the state's Medicaid system.

Florida is one of nine states that have taken on unexpected health care bills by passing comprehensive regulations. 

Biden-Harris Debate Rematch Highlights Health Plan Differences

Aug 1, 2019

Which of these Democrats can insure more Americans?

As Wednesday’s debate made vividly clear, there are almost as many versions of “Medicare for All” as there are Democratic candidates — and each one thinks their plan is the path to insuring every American.

For California Sen. Kamala Harris and former Vice President Joe Biden, health care became the sequel to their first fiery exchange — when Harris, peering over at Biden, movingly recalled during the first round of debates last month how the busing policy he once backed had changed the course of her life. 

Updated at 1:30 p.m. ET

On Wednesday, Alexis Conell will mark seven years since she received the kidney transplant that saved her life, but the 53-year-old Chicago woman isn't exactly celebrating.

Although the federal government paid most of the costs for her 2012 transplant, a long-standing Medicare policy halted coverage three years later for the drugs that keep her body from rejecting the organ.

Health insurers that treat millions of seniors have overcharged Medicare by nearly $30 billion over the past three years alone, but federal officials say they are moving ahead with long-delayed plans to recoup at least part of the money.

University of Miami's Miller School of Medicine / Via the South Florida Sun Sentinel

Seeing your doctor in person could wind up costing you a lot more than another option insurance companies are starting to push: unlimited 24/7 access to primary care doctors via smartphone, tablet or computer, with zero out-of-pocket co-pays, as reported by the Sun Sentinel.

Welcome to the future of telemedicine, also known as telehealth.

Worker's Comp Law Upheld By Appeals Court

Jun 18, 2019
MIAMI HERALD

In a dispute about treatment of a shoulder injury, a state appeals court Tuesday rejected a constitutional challenge to part of Florida’s workers’ compensation insurance laws.

A three-judge panel of the 1st District Court of Appeal issued a 14-page decision in a case filed by Teresita De Jesus Abreu against the Broward County School Board and Broward’s Riverland Elementary School.

THE AIDS INSTITUTE

Lauren Killgore first learned about her health insurance company’s new policy at the beginning of 2017, when her husband, a 26-year-old hemophiliac, had an internal bleed in his knee.

Her husband had always used a $12,000 copay card from the drug manufacturer to pay for his medication.

The insurance company would apply the payment to their $6,500 deductible, helping them meet their out-of-pocket obligation for the year.

But this time, the pharmacy said the payment could not be used toward their deductible.

Insurers would be given the green light to sell scaled-back health insurance policies under a bill that the Florida Legislature passed Friday. 

House Looks To ‘Kick-Start’ Telehealth

Mar 7, 2019

Insurers could get tax breaks worth as much as $30 million and use out-of-state health providers in their networks under a House bill meant to champion the use of “telehealth” in Florida. 

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