health insurance

Worker's Comp Law Upheld By Appeals Court

Jun 18, 2019
MIAMI HERALD

In a dispute about treatment of a shoulder injury, a state appeals court Tuesday rejected a constitutional challenge to part of Florida’s workers’ compensation insurance laws.

A three-judge panel of the 1st District Court of Appeal issued a 14-page decision in a case filed by Teresita De Jesus Abreu against the Broward County School Board and Broward’s Riverland Elementary School.

THE AIDS INSTITUTE

Lauren Killgore first learned about her health insurance company’s new policy at the beginning of 2017, when her husband, a 26-year-old hemophiliac, had an internal bleed in his knee.

Her husband had always used a $12,000 copay card from the drug manufacturer to pay for his medication.

The insurance company would apply the payment to their $6,500 deductible, helping them meet their out-of-pocket obligation for the year.

But this time, the pharmacy said the payment could not be used toward their deductible.

Insurers would be given the green light to sell scaled-back health insurance policies under a bill that the Florida Legislature passed Friday. 

House Looks To ‘Kick-Start’ Telehealth

Mar 7, 2019

Insurers could get tax breaks worth as much as $30 million and use out-of-state health providers in their networks under a House bill meant to champion the use of “telehealth” in Florida. 

DeSantis Backs ‘Shared Savings’ Health Plan

Feb 28, 2019

Gov Ron DeSantis is throwing his support behind a proposal that could lead to insurance companies and HMOs returning premiums to savvy customers who are willing to shop around for health care. 

Florida lawmakers will gather March 5 in the House chamber to hear Gov. Ron DeSantis give his first State of the State address, the traditional start of the 60-day legislative session.

32BJ SEIU
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

County commissioners voted unanimously Tuesday to advance a proposal that would increase the amount employers are required to pay towards health insurance for county contracted and subcontracted workers, like airport and port workers.

The ordinance would require employers to contribute $3.44 per hour to an employee's health insurance starting in 2021. The current rate is $1.63 per hour.

The proposal now has a public hearing scheduled for Feb. 26. at 10 a.m. 

"Medicare-for-all," once widely considered a fringe proposal for providing health care in the U.S., is getting more popular. Several Democratic presidential hopefuls are getting behind the idea.

Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., endorsed the approach Monday in a CNN town hall-style event, saying her aim would be to eliminate all private insurance.

Robert and Tiffany Cano of San Tan Valley, Ariz., have a new marriage, a new house and a 10-month-old son, Brody, who is delighted by his ability to blow raspberries.

They also have a stack of medical bills that threatens to undermine it all.

In the months since their sturdy, brown-eyed boy was born, the Canos have acquired nearly $12,000 in medical debt — so much that they need a spreadsheet to track what they owe to hospitals and doctors.

DeSantis Panel Says Health Innovation Needed

Dec 20, 2018

Supporters of Gov.-elect Ron DeSantis want Florida to take a more active role in finding innovative ways to overhaul how health care is delivered in the state.

If last Friday's district court ruling that the Affordable Care Act is unconstitutional were to be upheld, far more than the law's most high-profile provisions would be at stake.

In fact, canceling the law in full — as Judge Reed O'Connor in Fort Worth, Texas, ordered in his 55-page decision — could thrust the entire health care system into chaos.

Sarah Witter couldn't catch a break even though her leg had gotten several.

As she lay on a ski trail in Vermont last February, Witter, now 63, knew she hadn't suffered a regular fall because she couldn't get up. An X-ray showed she had fractured two bones in her lower left leg.

A surgeon at Rutland Regional Medical Center screwed two gleaming metal plates onto the bones to stabilize them. "I was very pleased with how things came together," the doctor wrote in his operation notes.

everydayplus / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Florida's largest health insurer has seen a 45 percent drop in opioid prescriptions since it stopped paying for OxyContin.

It has been almost a year since Florida Blue announced that it would no longer provide prescription payments for the popular painkiller and would require advanced permission for any opioid prescription lasting longer than seven days.

It replaced OxyContnin in its drug plans with a different opioid, Xtampza. That drug is designed to be more difficult to crush, making it tougher to snort or inject.

Florida may have a plan to address the increasing number of children who lack health insurance, but it remains to be seen whether the proposal will get funded.

The Affordable Care Act faces a new legal challenge after a federal judge in Texas ruled the law unconstitutional on Friday. The decision risks throwing the nation's health care system into turmoil should it be upheld on appeal. But little will be different in the meantime.

"Nothing changes for now," says Julie Rovner, chief Washington correspondent of Kaiser Health News.

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