Immigration and Customs Enforcement

A Chinese businesswoman who was incarcerated for eight months for trespassing at President Donald Trump’s Palm Beach club was transferred Wednesday from a federal lockup to the custody of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement for deportation to China.

Yujing Zhang, 33, was moved to the Glades County Detention Center in Moore Haven after being held at the Paul Rein Detention Facility in Broward County following her sentencing last week, according to an ICE website.

It was not clear when Zhang, who faces a removal proceeding, would be deported to China.

When José moved his family to the United States from Mexico nearly two decades ago, he had hopes of giving his children a better life.

The number of people apprehended by U.S. authorities, either attempting to cross the southwest border illegally or presenting themselves at a port of entry, declined for the fifth consecutive month, according to new figures released by U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

Just over 45,000 people were apprehended in October, down from a spike of 144,000 in May — an almost 70 percent decline.

Authorities also report a significant demographic shift among those apprehended.

John Hart / Wisconsin State Journal via AP

A new study says allowing the estimated 750,000 undocumented immigrants living in Florida to obtain driver’s licenses would not only ease their lives, but also increase state revenue and public safety.

The findings of the study by nonpartisan Florida Policy Institute (FPI) could play a large part in upcoming legislation being introduced by state Sen. David Simmons, R-Altamonte Springs, aimed at allowing driver’s licenses for all.

The bill would align Florida with 14 other states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, all of whom have passed similar laws.

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments Tuesday in a highly anticipated set of cases that threatens the legal status of some 700,000 young immigrants — often called DREAMers — who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children. It's a program that President Trump tried to rescind seven months after taking office, only to have the lower courts block his action.

The future of DACA hangs in the balance as the Supreme Court prepares to hear arguments about the program next week.

Stomach Bug Hits 115 Detainees At Immigration Center

Nov 6, 2019
John McCall / MIAMI HERALD

About 115 detainees were treated for “gastrointestinal distress” at an immigration detention center in South Florida over the weekend, Immigration and Customs Enforcement confirmed Tuesday, about 16 percent of the facility’s detainee population.

Some unknown illness caused an outbreak at Broward Transitional Center, the immigration detention facility at 3900 N. Powerline Road in Pompano Beach, multiple visitors said.

C.M. GUERRERO / Miami Herald

Immigration attorneys say the Trump Administration has started to reject its own written rules, effectively making it impossible for many people with Temporary Protected Status  to get permanent residency in the United States. The move essentially cuts off a path to citizenship for TPS holders from Haiti, El Salvador, Honduras and other countries, many of whom have lived in the U.S. for decades.

HHS To Shutter Homestead Detention Center, A Victory For Immigration Activists

Oct 28, 2019
AL DIAZ / MIAMI HERALD

The private prison company running the Homestead detention center that housed thousands of migrant children since 2018 and became a symbol of the Trump administration’s immigration policies will not have its contract renewed, according to an email sent to Rep. Debbie Mucarsel-Powell, D-Miami, by the Department of Health and Human Services on Friday.

At the place where music, technology and politics converge, you'll find ... discord. A group of more than 380 musicians — including well-known indie artists like Ted Leo, Deerhoof, Damon & Naomi, Zola Jesus, Downtown Boys and Sheer Mag — pledged in an open letter on Thursday to cut all business ties with Amazon over the work of its gargantuan Amazon Web Services subsidiary.

Updated at 10:02 p.m. ET

Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan is leaving his post, the latest casualty at the department responsible for protecting U.S. borders.

President Trump said in a tweet Friday night that McAleenan had done an "outstanding job" but that he wanted to "spend more time with family and go to the private sector."

Trump added that he would announce a new acting secretary next week.

Earlier this year, the State Department quietly rolled out new limits on one of President Trump's favorite targets: the diversity visa lottery.

The White House made ending the program one of the "pillars" of its immigration policy proposal last year. But those proposals went nowhere on Capitol Hill.

So the administration tried something different: It is restricting who can apply for the diversity visa, in a way that advocates say will make it much harder for low-income immigrants to apply.

Associated Press

A federal judge has temporarily blocked a portion of a controversial Florida law that called on local police to cross state lines to assist federal immigration officials but left in place a provision where the officers would have to hold undocumented immigrants until the feds pick them up.

The Trump administration will no longer allow migrant families apprehended at the border to enter the U.S. under the immigration policy commonly known as "catch and release."

The policy change was announced Monday by Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Kevin McAleenan in remarks at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, D.C.

ELISE AMENDOLA / AP

The Trump administration reversed itself Thursday and said it will again allow immigrants who are facing serious illnesses to remain in the U.S. to get medical care without fear of deportation.

A month ago, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services announced that the long-standing policy protecting such immigrants, known as “medically deferred action,” would apply only to military members and their families.

The agency’s move sparked nationwide outrage by immigration advocates, who said the policy change was inhumane.

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