Juan Guaido

Juan Guaidó's war room is a kind of no man's land.

The opposition leader, who is recognized by dozens of countries as Venezuela's rightful head of state, works out of a mostly vacant office in a Caracas high-rise with a couple of sofas, broken swivel chairs and carpet that could use a cleaning.

Guaidó has spent the past five months moving among safe houses and borrowed office space to keep government security agents, who have arrested dozens of opposition leaders, off balance. No one bothers to fix things up because his team may be moving on soon.

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

Venezuela’s authoritarian regime is still in power. But that hasn’t stopped the country’s opposition leader Juan Guaidó from conducting a parallel government.

Guaidó declared himself Venezuela’s legitimate president this year, and the U.S. and more than 50 other countries recognize him.

Tuesday night his ambassador to the U.S., Carlos Vecchio, visited Doral to talk with Venezuelan expats about a new website where they can register for consular services Guaidó hopes to offer them, such as new Venezuelan passports.

Jose A. Iglesias / Miami Herald

When we talk about security in the Americas these days, Venezuela dominates the conversation. That was the case Wednesday at Florida International University – where the top U.S. military official here addressed the debate over U.S. intervention in the Venezuela crisis.

Ariana Cubillos / AP

Last week representatives of Venezuela's socialist regime and its political opposition met for talks in Oslo, Norway. Norway had offered earlier this year to mediate between the two sides – but news of the meetings was a surprise, because less than a month ago opposition leader Juan Guaidó called (unsuccessfully) for an outright military overthrow of authoritarian President Nicolás Maduro.

Boris Vergara / AP

It’s been a week since Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó called for the overthrow of authoritarian President Nicolás Maduro. That effort failed when top military leaders balked at joining him. But it sparked renewed anti-government unrest and showed cracks in the military's loyalty to the socialist regime – which is widely blamed for dismantling Venezuela’s democracy and destroying its economy.

Fernando Llano / AP

COMMENTARY

So Juan Guaidó is now 0-for-3 in his attempts to incite a regime-changing military uprising in Venezuela.

The opposition leader had hoped to get the armed forces to back him in January when he declared himself (rightfully so) Venezuela’s constitutionally legitimate president. And again in February when he tried to push humanitarian aid into Venezuela from Colombia.

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

After Tuesday's unrest in Venezuela, expats here gathered at a Doral church to ponder the ongoing crisis in their native country. WLRN spoke with many of those Venezuelans last night and found a surprising degree of optimism.

Updated at 3 p.m. ET

The plane was on the tarmac. Nicolás Maduro, the disputed president of Venezuela, was ready to head to Havana amid widespread international condemnation and the threat of being ousted. But the Russian government talked him out of leaving.

Sherrilyn Cabrera

Large crowds of Venezuelans gathered in Doral Tuesday to watch news of an attempted military uprising unfold in their country. Many said it was the moment they'd long been waiting for.

Crowds began to form in the early morning at El Arepazo Original, a Venezuelan restaurant and community gathering place, as news filtered out of Venezuela that interim President Juan Guaidó was waging an attempt to oust President Nicolás Maduro. By midday hundreds gathered. 

  

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

Venezuelan art dealer Romy Moreno was in South Florida last month when she got an urgent call from her husband, Roberto Marrero, in Caracas.

Agents of Venezuela's authoritarian President Nicolás Maduro were ransacking their apartment and arresting Marrero – who is the chief of staff to Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó. The U.S. and 50 other countries recognize Guaidó as Venezuela's legitimate president.

Fernando Llano / AP

The political turmoil in Venezuela continues to intensify.

On Tuesday, officials loyal to President Nicolas Maduro stripped opposition leader Juan Guaidó of immunity – which means he could face prosecution and arrest.

In January, Guaidó declared himself Venezuela’s interim president. More than 50 countries, including the United States, have recognized him as president.

Natacha Pisarenko / AP

Venezuela’s authoritarian regime may be one step closer to arresting Juan Guaidó. Until Wednesday, it let the opposition leader keep the same immunity as any other legislator. But Guaidó has now lost that – and mass anti-government protests he's called for this weekend may put him in deeper danger.

Pedro Portal / El Nuevo Herald

The Red Cross says Venezuela’s authoritarian regime will finally let international aid in to help ease a catastrophic humanitarian crisis. WLRN spoke with the wife of interim Venezuelan President Juan Guaidó on Sunday during her visit to South Florida to rally support.

Susan Walsh / AP

Venezuela’s authoritarian regime may have finally acknowledged on Friday that the country is suffering a humanitarian crisis. The news comes as the wife of Venezuela’s opposition leader Juan Guaidó visits South Florida this weekend to collect humanitarian aid.

Fernando Llanos / Associated Press

Vice President Mike Pence will meet Wednesday with the wife of Juan Guaidó, the Venezuelan leader whom the White House has embraced as the interim president.

White House officials said Fabiana Rosales de Guaidó will join Pence for a bilateral meeting at the White House in which Pence will express the United States’ continued support for democracy in Venezuela.

“In the meeting, Vice President Pence will reiterate once again the United States’ unwavering commitment to stand for a free Venezuela,” a White House official said.

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