Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Shooting

courtesy of Lori Alhadeff

Legislation named in honor of 14-year-old Alyssa Alhadeff, who was one of 17 people who died in the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas School, would require silent panic alarms in every public school building in Florida to alert police and rescuers to emergencies.

“We need to create layers and layers of protection to help keep our schools safe,” said Lori Alhadeff, Alyssa’s mother. “Alyssa’s Law, these silent panic alarms, is another layer of protection to help save lives.”

Leslie Ovalle / WLRN

Just hours after the nation’s phone screens lit up once again with the alert of another school shooting, a group of about 100 high school and college students fanned out behind a podium in Florida’s Capitol and faced TV cameras.

In sometimes shaky voices, they demanded that the violence end.

“America knows the pain and knows this outrage. To the community of Santa Clarita, we stand with you,” said University of Central Florida student Serena Rodrigues, 20, referencing the high school shooting on Thursday that left at least two students dead.

Sam Turken / WLRN

Broward County educators, lawyers and residents are pushing back against criticism of Broward public schools’ PROMISE program, saying it’s vital to keeping youth out of the criminal justice system for minor offenses.

A regular drumbeat of mass shootings in the U.S., both inside schools and out, has ramped up pressure on education and law enforcement officials to do all they can to prevent the next attack.

Close to all public schools in the U.S. conducted some kind of lockdown drill in 2015-2016, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

AL DIAZ / MIAMI HERALD

Most students who committed deadly school attacks over the past decade were badly bullied, had a history of disciplinary trouble and their behavior concerned others but was never reported, according to a U.S. Secret Service study released Thursday.

In at least four cases, attackers wanted to emulate other school shootings, including those at Columbine High School in Colorado, Virginia Tech University and Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut. The research was launched following the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

Lynne Sladky / AP

Former Broward Deputy Scot Peterson can’t be held criminally responsible for failing to stop the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School because the state has already pinned the blame on his boss, ousted Sheriff Scott Israel, Peterson’s lawyers argued Tuesday.

POOL IMAGE VIA AP

Defense attorneys for the confessed Parkland school shooter are warning that there could be drawbacks to starting his trial early next year.

Last week, Broward Circuit Judge Elizabeth Scherer ordered prosecutors and Nikolas Cruz’s defense to be ready for jury selection by Jan. 27. But during a pre-trial hearing on Wednesday, defense attorneys said they need more time to finish interviewing witnesses and other preparations.

Steve Cannon / AP

The Florida Senate is poised to formally remove Scott Israel as sheriff of Broward County Wednesday and, in a largely party-line vote, uphold his suspension from office by Gov. Ron DeSantis.

While the vote is expected to be seen as a political victory for the governor and long-sought validation for the families of the victims of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting who blame Israel’s failed leadership for the deaths of 17 students and faculty in 2018, it won’t end the debate.

Nikolas Cruz
Sun Sentinel / WLRN

A date has been set for trial in the case of confessed Parkland school shooter Nikolas Cruz versus the State of Florida. 

Judge Elizabeth Scherer issued an order on Thursday announcing the pretrial motions will begin on January 13, 2020 and jury selection will start on January 27. 

"In February, 2019, this Court put all parties on notice that the trial in this matter would commence in January, 2020," the order states. 

Court Upholds Prosecution Of Miami Lakes Middle Student For Threats

Oct 17, 2019
Pixabay

In a case stemming from a threat posted online after last year’s mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, an appeals court has rejected a challenge to the prosecution of a teen for disrupting his middle school.

The ruling Wednesday by the 3rd District Court of Appeal focused on whether the Miami Lakes Middle School student should have been shielded from prosecution because he posted the threat while off school grounds.

The teen, identified by the initials O.P-G, was found guilty of violating a law that seeks to prevent “disruption of a school function.”

MSD Public Safety Commission
Lily Oppenheimer / WLRN

This story was updated with additional information about potential legal action from the Southern Poverty Law Center at 1:03 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 17.

The Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Public Safety Commission wrapped up its two-day meeting in Orlando a couple hours earlier than planned on Wednesday. 

Sam Turken / WLRN

The state commission that’s investigating the Parkland school shooting is recommending that law enforcement and school districts develop concrete strategies to better communicate with families of victims immediately following mass casualty events.

It’s also calling on Broward County to finally resolve deficiencies with its emergency communications system.

Amy Beth Bennett / South Florida Sun Sentinel

In a precursor to next week’s special Senate session to decide if Scott Israel should get his job back as Broward County sheriff, parents of the students murdered in the Parkland school shooting on Monday urged and warned state senators not to do it.

Colleen Wright / Miami Herald

The Miami-Dade County Public Schools police force has investigated two dozen threats against schools and arrested six people in connection with those events since the academic year began in August, with nearly all of the incidents explained as “nothing more than a joke,” according to the superintendent.

A special master appointed by the Florida Senate is recommending reinstatement for Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel. Gov. Ron DeSantis suspended the sheriff in January, citing the shootings at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in which 17 people died.

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