mass shooting

"If there was ever a moment for all of us to reflect and reaffirm our most basic beliefs that everybody counts and everybody has dignity, now's the time," President Obama said in remarks during a visit to Orlando, Fla., to express his support for the victims of Sunday's deadly attack and their families.

As NPR's Scott Horsley tells our Newscast unit, "The president hopes his presence in Orlando will provide some support to the families of the 49 people who died in Sunday's massacre, as well as the dozens of people who are still recovering from the wounds they suffered."

The gunman in Sunday's attack at an Orlando gay nightclub used Facebook "to search for and post terrorism-related content" before and even during the assault, according to Wisconsin Sen. Ron Johnson.

On the day of the attack, Omar Mateen apparently searched Facebook for "Pulse Orlando" — the name of the nightclub where 49 people were killed — and "shooting," Johnson, head of the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, said in a letter to Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg.

He said Mateen also apparently posted the following messages:

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer says Omar Mateen, the alleged perpetrator of the worst mass shooting in U.S. history, drove around Orlando Saturday night before opening fire on Pulse nightclub at around 2:00 am Sunday.

“What I know concretely is that he was driving around that evening and visited several locations. What I have seen on the news I can’t independently verify,” said Dyer.

When asked if other locations included theme parks, as reported in some media stories, Dyer said he thinks it’s been, quote “pretty accurately depicted on the news.”

A complicated picture has emerged of 29-year-old Omar Mateen, who opened fire in a gay Orlando nightclub. The attack left 49 dead and dozens more wounded in the worst mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

The moments after Sunday’s fatal nightclub shooting have felt long and heavy for Nuren Haider. The Orlando native says her hijab—a scarf and symbol of her faith—has become a marker.

In the wake of the Orlando shooting, people across the state and around the world are standing in support of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community. But some activists want more than thoughts and prayers. They want policy change.

President Barack Obama will travel to Orlando on Thursday to pay respects to the victims of last weekend’s nightclub shooting and to stand in solidarity with the community as it embarks on recovery, the White House said Monday night.

For anyone wanting to help victims of the Orlando night club shooting, Florida Gov. Rick Scott has activated a state disaster fund to take donations.

Since the mass shooting in Orlando, there has been a huge response from people who want to donate blood. And, while the current blood donations are appreciated, some donation centers say they may need more people to donate next week.

Scenes of Grief and Healing in South Florida After Orlando Attack

Jun 13, 2016
Spencer Parts

In the hours and days following the Sunday massacre at a gay club in Orlando, members of South Florida's LGBT community have gathered to mourn and to provide comfort to each other.

Editor's note, June 16: An earlier version of this story said Omar Mateen carried an AR-15, based on comments from Orlando Police Chief John Mina, who said Sunday that the gun was an "AR-15-assault-type rifle." Law enforcement officials subsequently told NPR that the gun was a Sig Sauer MCX, a rifle similar to an AR-15 but also different in fundamental ways. This story reflects the change.

In the wake of a mass shooting at a gay nightclub in Orlando that left at least 49 people dead and more than 50 wounded, queer Latino folks around the country are reflecting on the horror of the attack.

Sunday began with one of the deadliest shootings in American history — at least 49 people were killed and more than 50 were injured. The attack took place at Pulse, a gay nightclub in Orlando, and the suspect was an American Muslim who pledged allegiance to ISIS the night of the attack.

Caleb Collins got called into work. Liz Robles couldn't find a baby sitter. Neveah Heart just decided to stay in that night.

Early Sunday morning, a gunman sprayed bullets across a gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla., killing 49, and the city woke up to the horror of a terrorism-inspired attack on their community. Among the dozens who gathered near Pulse nightclub waiting for word about whether their family members and friends were safe, for some, there was also the sense that they themselves could have just as easily been victims.

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