mass shooting

Editor's note, June 16: An earlier version of this story said Omar Mateen carried an AR-15, based on comments from Orlando Police Chief John Mina, who said Sunday that the gun was an "AR-15-assault-type rifle." Law enforcement officials subsequently told NPR that the gun was a Sig Sauer MCX, a rifle similar to an AR-15 but also different in fundamental ways. This story reflects the change.

In the wake of a mass shooting at a gay nightclub in Orlando that left at least 49 people dead and more than 50 wounded, queer Latino folks around the country are reflecting on the horror of the attack.

Sunday began with one of the deadliest shootings in American history — at least 49 people were killed and more than 50 were injured. The attack took place at Pulse, a gay nightclub in Orlando, and the suspect was an American Muslim who pledged allegiance to ISIS the night of the attack.

Caleb Collins got called into work. Liz Robles couldn't find a baby sitter. Neveah Heart just decided to stay in that night.

Early Sunday morning, a gunman sprayed bullets across a gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla., killing 49, and the city woke up to the horror of a terrorism-inspired attack on their community. Among the dozens who gathered near Pulse nightclub waiting for word about whether their family members and friends were safe, for some, there was also the sense that they themselves could have just as easily been victims.

Miami Beach Police Department

As law enforcement agencies try to piece together  what happened Sunday morning at a gay nightclub in Orlando, when at least 50 people were gunned down, many in South Florida wonder about security and how to protect themselves and those they love from similar attacks. 

  "Every time there is a pride event, there is that fear that exists, especially since we have seen the passage of marriage equality," says Cindy Brown, Miami-Dade development officer for Equality Florida, the largest LGBTQ rights advocacy group in the state. 

 

On Sunday morning, a gunman at the gay nightclub Pulse in Orlando, Fla., perpetrated the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history. He killed 49 people and injured more than 50.

The city of Orlando has released the names of the identified victims, after notifying their next of kin.

Tim Padgett / WLRN

Agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) and local police spent hours  Sunday going through the apartment of the alleged Orlando shooter, Omar Sadduque Mateen, as well as his parents'  house in Fort Pierce. 

A small gaggle of reporters and TV cameras were parked outside the police tape in front of the apartment complex in Fort Pierce where Mateen allegedly lived. The FBI and local police were on the scene, but neither could confirm anything about the investigation.

Orlando Nightclub Shooting: How to Help

Jun 12, 2016
Lynare Robbins / Courtesy

A shooting at a gay nightclub in Orlando has left 50 dead and more injured, reported to be the largest mass shooting in U.S. history. Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency Sunday morning.

There are a number of opportunities in South Florida to support the victims and their families.

Attend a vigil

STEVE NESIUS / Reuters

Fifty people died -including the gunman- and another 53 were injured when a man opened fire and seized hostages at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, early Sunday, making it the worst mass shooting in U.S. history, according to authorities. 

Authorities in Orlando started to release the names of the first casualties of the deadly attack on The Pulse nightclub: Edward Sotomayor Jr., Stanley Almodovar III, Luis Omar Ocasio-Capo and Juan Ramon Guerrero. More names will be released in the next hours. 

CBS4 News

Nine people were shot and wounded at West Little River Park while playing basketball Monday afternoon.

The shooter allegedly opened fire from the passenger seat of a Nissan Maxima, Miami-Dade County police said.

A 16-year-old boy was shot in the head and is in critical but stable condition. Police say the other eight victims were shot in their extremities and are expected to fully recover.

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